Poetry Month: 'I Think That I Shall Never See, A Poem As Lovely As ... One On ATC' For National Poetry Month, All Things Considered asked listeners to tweet poems of their own — including the rhyme that tops this story. The plot thickened when a high school English class jumped in.
NPR logo

'I Think That I Shall Never See, A Poem As Lovely As ... One On ATC'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472808961/472816841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
'I Think That I Shall Never See, A Poem As Lovely As ... One On ATC'

'I Think That I Shall Never See, A Poem As Lovely As ... One On ATC'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/472808961/472816841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

(Reading) I think that I shall never see, a poem as lovely as ... one on ATC. Well, this is your chance to get some original poetry just like that on our show every weekend this month to help us celebrate April Poetry Month. Last week, we asked you to tweet us poems - yes, Tweet, so 140 characters or less with the hashtag #NPRpoetry. That first one I just read was from @RikStevensAP. Our producer Colin Dwyer has been looking through all the poems that you've already been tweeting to us. And he is here to give us a little breakdown of what he's seen so far. Hey Colin.

COLIN DWYER, BYLINE: Hello.

KELLY: So you've been at this for a week. What's the response been like?

DWYER: It has been overwhelming.

KELLY: Really?

DWYER: Really.

KELLY: OK, so 140 characters or less - the poems obviously have to be short. Other than that, any trends so far?

DWYER: Well, the trends naturally grow out of that shortness. You're seeing a lot of haiku...

KELLY: Right.

DWYER: ...A very short style poetry, a lot of very meta poems commenting on just how hard it is to write in 140 characters or less.

KELLY: (Laughter) Yeah.

DWYER: But then there was also a really surprising one. I saw that there were a lot of tweets also tagged with #PoetryWHS, like this one from @no_ragratz - (reading) I'm sitting in class - I was just recently asked - to write a haiku.

KELLY: Huh, OK, do we know what WHS is, or has somebody been assigned to write - to write for us?

DWYER: That was the birth of the investigation. I genuinely had absolutely no idea what this was. And so I did a little bit of sleuthing and eventually found out that this all came from a poetry teacher and English teacher at Windsor High School named Ms. Natalie Plowman. And she actually asked her class to put together some poems.

NATALIE PLOWMAN: Some of them really got into it. A couple of them, as you can probably see from the hashtag, felt that it was a requirement and silly. So it was kind of all over the spectrum.

DWYER: So you can see some of those silly ones, one from @Cor13in. This one goes (reading) I have to pee. I see a big aspen tree. Good enough for me.

KELLY: (Laughter). We've all been there, right?

DWYER: (Laughter) Yes, plenty of us have. Not so many tweet about it, I suppose.

KELLY: All right, that's our producer Colin Dwyer, also our resident poetry guru for the month of April. Colin, remind us of the instructions so people out there listening can keep writing in.

DWYER: Yes. It can be any format. Tweet them out to the mouth with the hashtag @NPRpoetry. You can also to tweet at us - @npratc.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.