A Mother's Day StoryCorps: Nearing Life's End, A Mother Reflects On 'The Most Important Thing I Did' Patricia Mishler was diagnosed with ALS — a death sentence, according to her doctors. But before she goes, whenever that may be, she says she knows her greatest achievements: her two daughters.
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Nearing Life's End, A Mother Reflects On 'The Most Important Thing I Did'

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Nearing Life's End, A Mother Reflects On 'The Most Important Thing I Did'

Nearing Life's End, A Mother Reflects On 'The Most Important Thing I Did'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476872164/476994043" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is Friday, which is when we hear from StoryCorps. Mother's Day is this weekend. So today we hear a conversation between a mother and her daughters. Almost 40 years ago, Patricia Mishler moved to the United States from England with her two daughters, Suzanne and Janette. A year and half ago, Patricia was diagnosed with ALS. Recently, Suzanne and Janette brought Patricia to a StoryCorps booth to talk about the disease.

SUZANNE LYNCH: So, Mom, how do you understand ALS? What is that illness?

PATRICIA MISHLER: Well, the first thing about is is it's terminal. Most doctors will tell you three to 10 years, but nobody really knows. And so it's a mourning process. You mourn the things you can no longer do. Mostly I like to do things with my hands and this disease took my hands first. So something like gardening, I can't do that anymore. And that is the most frustrating thing. You lose the ability to do the things that you love best.

JANETTE LYNCH: Do you look at your life differently now than before you were diagnosed?

MISHLER: Oh, most definitely. You see yourself decline. I can hardly feed myself. And the things you thought were so important - not as important as you thought they were. I mean, having you two was probably the most important thing I did in my life. I was so proud of having a child and then I was fortunate enough to have two. I'm glad to see the young ladies that you've developed into.

J. LYNCH: I never knew fear because you always told me just, you want that? Go do it. So there's no way I would have accomplished a fraction of what I did in my life without you.

S. LYNCH: And I don't think I could have gotten through my first year of motherhood without you. You know, I was doing it by myself, so it was nice to know that I had your support

J. LYNCH: Are you afraid to die?

MISHLER: Absolutely not. I'll tell you what, the hardest thing is to leave you behind. But we can't focus on that because we don't know how long it will be. It could be a year. It could be 20 years. I'm not afraid. But I'll be sad when the time comes. But I'll tell you, first and foremost, the next person that tells me, oh, we're all going to die of something, I am going to hit.

(LAUGHTER)

MISHLER: It's about the worst thing you can hear from anybody.

S. LYNCH: How do you want to be remembered, Mom?

MISHLER: That I love my family and that I'm just so proud, just so proud of that.

(MUSIC)

INSKEEP: A Mother's Day StoryCorps conversation, Patricia Mishler talking with her daughters, Suzanne and Janette Lynch in Nashville, Tenn. Their interview will be archived with the rest of the StoryCorps collection at the American Folklife Center in the Library of Congress.

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