With A 2-Km. Pizza, Naples Aims To Deliver A Slice Of History : The Salt On Sunday, this Italian city — birthplace of the Margherita pizza — will try to swipe Milan's record for the world's longest pie.
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With A 2-Km. Pizza, Naples Aims To Deliver A Slice Of History

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With A 2-Km. Pizza, Naples Aims To Deliver A Slice Of History

With A 2-Km. Pizza, Naples Aims To Deliver A Slice Of History

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Imagine a pizza, a big one, 2 kilometers long. Well, this weekend the Italian city of Naples wants the world to know that it is the heart and soul of the pizza world. And to prove it, a hundred chefs are getting together to make the world's longest pizza. I spoke with Alessandro Marinacci, who's part of a pro-pizza organization in Naples and the mastermind behind this idea. So can you tell me why you're trying to build a 2-kilometer-long pizza?

ALESSANDRO MARINACCI: Because as you know, Naples and Italy is the homeland of the pizza. The pizza born in Naples. Now the record was made in Milan, in the north of the Italy. But pizza born here.

GREENE: Oh, so you know that the record is being held by Milan right now, and you feel like Naples needs to make a statement and say we are the home of pizza. We will make the biggest pizza.

MARINACCI: Right. Right, yes.

GREENE: Can you tell me how much cheese, how much flour, how much sauce we're talking about here?

MARINACCI: Yes. We will prepare a pizza margherita. You know, the marghertita was named in honor of the Queen Margherita. So with the tomato, mozzarella, olive oil and basil - we will use 2,000 kilogram of flour, 2,000 kilogram of mozzarella and 1 and 1/2 kilogram of tomatoes, 200 liters of oil and 30 kilograms of basil.

GREENE: That's like enough oil that I could swim in it.

MARINACCI: (Laughter) Yes, I know. We use a lot, a lot of olive oil. I know, I know.

GREENE: OK. You are using wood-burning stoves to make this very long pizza. Is that difficult?

MARINACCI: Yes. It's too much difficult, but we have a designer and developed a special oven with an electric motor with the wheels so a team will drive the oven and the pizza will pass through the two mouth of the oven. The first mouth is to let the pizza coming in, and the other is to get it out.

GREENE: Then the pizza gets baked as the car drives across the pizza?

MARINACCI: Yes, exactly, perfect. It's a special kind of oven. We design it just for the event.

GREENE: That's very interesting. That sounds like something that would be very dramatic to see. When I think of Italy and when I think of Italians, you know, I think of the best-tasting food. Normally I wouldn't think of you as doing these crazy things like making a pizza that's 2-kilometers long. It would be more about the quality, the good taste. Why are you doing this in such size?

MARINACCI: Because we want to identify the city of Naples, where born pizza, with this kind of product. You know, something like Oktoberfest with beer in Munich. If you think to beer, you think to Munich because there they have Oktoberfest. That's why we attempt to set this new record because we think the record has to be in Naples.

GREENE: Could this become almost an arms race between Naples and Milan? Maybe you make a 2-kilometer pizza, and then Milan will make a 3-kilometer pizza, and you'll make a 4-kilometer pizza. I mean, where will this end?

MARINACCI: I don't know. At the moment, in Milan, they did a 1 kilometers and 600 meters.

GREENE: Well, best of luck to you, and I wish I could taste some of this pizza. I feel sad that I won't be there.

MARINACCI: Thank you very much, David. We wait for you in Naples.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GIMME PIZZA")

MARY-KATE AND ASHLEY OLSEN: (Singing) Pizza...

GREENE: I'm coming, Alessandro. That's Alessandro Marinacci in Naples. He's trying to make the world's longest pizza.

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