When You Just Want to Throw Something When a romance ends, it can happen in any one of a thousand ways -- and the results can be just as unexpected. For Judy Allen, the discovery that her husband was cheating on her led her to act out. But that was just the beginning of the story.
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When You Just Want to Throw Something

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When You Just Want to Throw Something

When You Just Want to Throw Something

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Time now for another moment from StoryCorps.

(Soundbite of music)

WERTHEIMER: StoryCorps is a national oral history project. Friends and family members talk about their lives in a StoryCorps recording booth. Some of their stories are heard Fridays on MORNING EDITION.

(Soundbite of music)

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Judy Allen is 65 years old and lives in Portland, Oregon. Her daughter, Kelley Edwards(ph), is 44 and interviewed her mom in the StoryCorps booth at New York's Grand Central Terminal.

Ms. KELLEY EDWARDS: Describe a memory when you felt independent and empowered.

Ms. JUDY ALLEN: I think the most empowered I ever felt in my life was when my philandering husband told me he was going to work and I suddenly realized he had gone to be with his girlfriend. I went to where she was staying and found his car parked in front of her house, got a great big rock about as big as a bowling ball from somebody's garden and heaved it through the back window of his car. That was wonderful. It felt great. And then I started divorce proceedings.

Years later he sent me a message somehow and told me that he still had some stuff of mine, books and things, that if I was ever traveling in Alaska, I should stop by and pick them up. And I was doing a business trip to Alaska, so I went up there, made an appointment, went to see him in his office, and he handed me a very heavy box. And there was a lot of heavy stuff, books and stuff, in there. And so I dragged it and schlepped it to airports all the way home. God, that was heavy. And I got home and opened it and there was nothing in it but that rock, which he had saved all those years.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Judy Allen with her daughter, Kelley Edwards. If you'd like to learn more about StoryCorps, its national tour and how you can participate, go to npr.org.

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INSKEEP: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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