More Than 6 Million U.S. Students Are 'Chronically Absent' : NPR Ed Thirteen percent of all students and nearly 20 percent of high school students are missing more than 15 days of school a year, according to the latest numbers from the Obama Administration.
NPR logo

More Than 6 Million U.S. Students Are 'Chronically Absent'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480181439/481501880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
More Than 6 Million U.S. Students Are 'Chronically Absent'

More Than 6 Million U.S. Students Are 'Chronically Absent'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480181439/481501880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's a reason some kids don't do well in school - they are not in school. The U.S. Education Department asked a question - it's how many kids miss three weeks of school. That's 15 school days. More than six million kids miss that much or more. Minority students are even more likely to be absent, as we hear from NPR's Elissa Nadworny.

ELISSA NADWORNY, BYLINE: More than a fifth of black high schoolers are missing a big chunk of the school year. It's 20 percent for Latino high school students and even higher for American Indians and Native Alaskans. For white highschoolers, it's 17 percent. These numbers are part of the Civil Rights Data Collection, a survey by the Education Department of more than 95,000 public schools.

The data is from the 2013-2014 school year. It's the first time the survey asked for the number of students who were chronically absent. John B. King, Jr., the secretary of education, puts it bluntly - even the best teachers aren't successful if the kids aren't in class. It's one of the oldest issues in school improvement, just getting kids to show up.

ROBERT BALFANZ: In many cases, the kids we're trying to give these better schooling opportunities to the most are not there regularly to take advantage of them.

NADWORNY: That's Robert Balfanz, who studies absenteeism at Johns Hopkins University. Research shows that students who miss this much school are way more likely to fall behind, even drop out.

BALFANZ: The things keeping kids out of school run the gamut from health, to housing, to the justice system.

NADWORNY: Most schools don't track this metric. Instead, they use average daily attendance - how many students show up on a specific day - or truancy. But experts argue chronic absenteeism, tracking absences by kid, is a more useful data point.

HEDY CHANG: This actually tells us something about whether kids get an equal opportunity to learn.

NADWORNY: Hedy Chang heads Attendance Works, a group that has been pushing for schools to target the kids who are missing a month or more of school. She says chronic absence is like the check engine light in your car.

CHANG: It goes off. You know something is amiss. But unless you open up the hood and start to figure out what's amiss, you can't find the solution.

NADWORNY: Schools can now start to open that hood. Today, the Obama administration released a website that maps out this data. And chronic absenteeism numbers aren't going away. Under the new federal education law, school districts will need to gather this data and report it in order to be in compliance with the law. Elissa Nadworny, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.