Recalling the Leap Into Motherhood For Patti Brennan, the decision to have her son, Conor Murphy, came in a flash. And there has been no room for regrets, either. But it meant a lifestyle change -- and a decision about who would look after Conor.
NPR logo

Recalling the Leap Into Motherhood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4828427/4849976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Recalling the Leap Into Motherhood

Recalling the Leap Into Motherhood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4828427/4849976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

On Fridays we bring you moments from StoryCorps. StoryCorps is the oral history project that's traveling the country collecting your stories. This week, voices from Wisconsin.

Twelve-year-old Connor Murphy has just started seventh grade. Earlier this past summer, he went to a StoryCorps booth to interview his mother, 53-year-old Patricia Brennan.

CONNOR MURPHY (Son): If you could like do anything again, would you raise me differently?

Ms. PATRICIA BRENNAN (Mother): Only if I was absolutely sure you would be exactly as you are right now because you are just a great kid. You know, I wasn't going to have any children. Aunt Bridget(ph) and Aunt Eileen(ph), they were like 10, 15 years younger than me, so I knew when I was growing up how complicated babies were and that they cried a lot. And I was a career lady. I had my teaching and my research and I was very successful early in my career and then I met Daddy. And after a couple of months I said, `You know, I just want you to know I'm not going to have any children, and so, if you think you want to have children, you better find another girlfriend, because as much as I love you, I don't think I'll ever have children.'

And then about a year later, I just...

MURPHY: I just like said, `OK.'

Ms. BRENNAN: No, I just--because Daddy never asked me about having a child. I just woke up one morning and I could think about nothing but having a child. And so I said, `Well, Daddy, I changed my mind.' I didn't call him Daddy then. `I changed my mind. I'd like to have a baby. Would that be all right with you?' And he said, `Well, sure.' And then I said, `Well, I'd like you to,' you know--we think raising children we both had the same values, but somebody needed to stay home and raise the child.' So I said, `Well, would you mind quitting your job and staying home?' Then he said, `Well, sure, I'll do that, too.' And he was very--it was a very fast decision. There was no hesitancy. I never looked back. I never changed my mind. And the only thing I would change now is I would have had you when I was younger. It was nice to have you when I was 40, but sometimes I think, `Well, I wonder what it would be like if I had had Connor when I was 30 or when I was 20 because then we would have been growing up in a different way together.'

MONTAGNE: Patricia Brennan and her son Connor Murphy. StoryCorps has two mobile booths. Currently one is in St. Louis, the other is in Seattle. And, as always, StoryCorps is in New York. To schedule your interview or to listen to more StoryCorps, visit npr.org.

(Announcements)

MONTAGNE: This is NPR News.

Copyright © 2005 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.