Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians : Shots - Health News The state this week became the 31st in the nation to expand Medicaid to the working poor. It's also the first state in the Deep South to embrace the Obamacare program.
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Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

Louisiana Medicaid Expansion Brings Insurance To Many New Orleans Musicians

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The performers and service workers in New Orleans are an important part of the experience for visitors there, but most of those jobs do not come with health insurance. As of today though, a different insurance option is available to many of those workers and hundreds of thousands of Louisiana's working poor. The state has expanded its Medicaid program as allowed under the Affordable Care Act. NPR's Allison Kodjak filed this report.

LISA KOTNIK: (Singing) I've got more honey than your heart can handle, got more honey for you to love.

ALLISON KODJAK, BYLINE: Lisa Lynn Kotnik is a singer who's performed on the New Orleans club circuit for more than 15 years.

KOTNIK: I sang at Fritzel's for eight years. I sang at The Bombay Club for 15 years. The list can go on and on and on.

KODJAK: And she's had a list of health problems, too - fibroids, a hysterectomy, a cyst drained.

KOTNIK: I had an aneurysm.

KODJAK: And like many of her fellow musicians, she's never really had health insurance.

KOTNIK: It was unaffordable, completely unaffordable.

KODJAK: Until now. Kotnik, whose stage name is Lisa Lynn, is at the New Orleans Musicians' Clinic signing up for Medicaid.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: And you could just look at the screen and make sure that your name is correct.

KOTNIK: That's correct.

KODJAK: The clinic, decorated with vintage Jazz Fest posters and signed photos of musicians like Harry Connick Jr. and James Booker, has served New Orleans musicians and artists.

KODJAK: for years, mostly for free. But its services were limited. Kotnik could see doctors there, but if she needed a blood test or an ultrasound, she had to go across town to University Hospital and potentially wait hours. And prescriptions weren't covered at all. Medicaid changes that, and that's a big deal for the state's health secretary, Rebekah Gee.

REBEKAH GEE: These are our heroes. These are our local New Orleans heroes, our musicians, the fabric of our community.

KODJAK: Gee says musicians, restaurant workers and hotel workers are the backbone of much of Louisiana's tourist economy.

GEE: People love to come to Louisiana. They love to eat our food and hear our music and stay in our hotels because those jobs are not high-income, we have a huge workforce that was uninsured.

KODJAK: Getting that workforce into the Medicaid program was a huge task. That's in part because the state legislature, facing a budget deficit, refused to allocate any money to hire more Medicaid workers.

GEE: The idea of having more state employees at a time when we were cutting the budget by $3 billion, there just was not an appetite for it.

KODJAK: Getting those Republican lawmakers on board with Medicaid at all was a big turnaround for Louisiana. Former Governor Bobby Jindal loudly opposed expanding the government program. But when the new Democratic governor, John Bel Edwards, took office in January, the first thing he did was expand the program. He argued that it would save the state money by shifting health costs to the federal government.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN BEL EDWARDS: The Medicaid expansion was something I believed in. I knew it would save money, but it no longer was optional because we had to implement every cost-saving measure that we could.

KODJAK: It fell to Gee to figure out how to sign up the estimated 375,000 people who would be eligible.

GEE: Talked to my husband, said gosh, I have no idea how we're going to get this done.

KODJAK: So Gee turned to other programs that work with the poor. Anyone who gets food stamps was automatically qualified for Medicaid, and anyone who had been in earlier state health plans for the poor was automatically signed up. But Gee says insurance is only the start.

GEE: Our major challenge is to transform the state from the most unhealthy state in the nation into a state that has a healthy future.

KOTNIK: (Singing) Got more honey if you can stand it.

KODJAK: For people like Lisa Lynn Kotnik, the Medicaid card is at least a start.

KOTNIK: (Singing) Come on baby, bring me all your love.

KODJAK: Allison Kodjak, NPR News.

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