U.S. Imposes New Human Rights Sanctions On North Korea : The Two-Way North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is directly sanctioned for the first time for his role in human rights abuses.
NPR logo

U.S. Imposes New Human Rights Sanctions On North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484954012/485058750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
U.S. Imposes New Human Rights Sanctions On North Korea

U.S. Imposes New Human Rights Sanctions On North Korea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484954012/485058750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The United States is imposing a new round of sanctions on North Korea. This time it's for human rights abuses. These sanctions target senior officials, including leader Kim Jong Un. The sanctions are part of an ongoing effort by the United States to isolate North Korea's government, as NPR's Jackie Northam reports.

JACKIE NORTHAM, BYLINE: The Obama administration says under leader Kim Jong Un, North Korea inflicts intolerable cruelty and hardship on millions of its own people. That includes extrajudicial killing, forced labor and torture. This is the first time Kim has been directly targeted with sanctions. Also on the list are five government entities and 10 other individuals involved with hunting down North Korean defectors and running labor and political prison camps that hold as many as 120,000 people. The sanctions are meant to financially cripple anyone on the list holding U.S. assets. State Department spokesman John Kirby says they're not just symbolic and could have broader financial implications.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN KIRBY: When we put somebody on a special designation list like this, it does reverberate around the world. And it can have an impact on the way other countries or other international bodies and financial institutions consider doing business.

NORTHAM: But there's debate how effective sanctions are. The U.S. has been using them for years as a way to get North Korea to stop testing nuclear and missile technology and return to negotiations - without much success. Jackie Northam, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

The Two-Way

The Two-Way

About