Sunday Puzzle: Prepare For Double Trouble In This Week's Puzzle — And A Swarm Of B's Every answer in this week's puzzle is a word with a double-B, like "rabbit." Rearrange the letters in the word provided to get the answer.
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Prepare For Double Trouble In This Week's Puzzle — And A Swarm Of B's

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Prepare For Double Trouble In This Week's Puzzle — And A Swarm Of B's

Prepare For Double Trouble In This Week's Puzzle — And A Swarm Of B's

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485375272/485432541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It is the season of conventions. The Republicans are meeting in Cleveland, the Democrats in Philadelphia. This weekend, Salt Lake City is hosting the National Puzzlers' League. Can't attend? Play with us. It's time to puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: I am joined by the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz. Hey, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: You are in Salt Lake at the National Puzzlers' League Convention. So, I mean, is puzzling as contentious as our politics are this year?

SHORTZ: This is a tension-free zone. There's almost no speeches. It's a whole weekend of word games.

MARTIN: OK. Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the word false. Divide it between the L and the S. And the start of the word is the start of fall, and the end of the word is the end of rise. And of course, fall and rise are opposites. And I asked you to do the same thing for the word shall - S-H-A-L-L - and I said there were three different solutions, and I want you to find all three. Well, my answers were short and tall, sharp and dull, and the tough one was shan't and will. Whole bunch of listeners had another answer, shaky and still, which I thought was as good as mine, so we counted that correct also.

MARTIN: A generous soul, you are. A lot of people gave one or two correct answers. But only 421 of you got three correct answers. And one of them is our randomly selected winner this week, Frank Camorani of Edina, Minn. He's on the line now. Hey, Frank, congratulations.

FRANK CAMORANI: Why, thank you very much.

MARTIN: How'd you figure it out?

CAMORANI: Well, the first two were easy. I just took the A-L-L and I got tall, and I had the opposite was short. And then I took the S-H-A and I had sharp and dull, and that was easy. And then shan't and will I put in there also but thought it would be dismissed because it was kind of archaic. But then I noticed that will and short are two of the answers, too. I thought that was a little embedding going on by our master (laughter).

MARTIN: Clever. So clever.

CAMORANI: (Laughter).

MARTIN: And what do you do in Edina, Minn.?

CAMORANI: Well, it's Edina. People here...

MARTIN: Oh, first of all, apologies to the good people of Edina (laughter).

CAMORANI: Well, I'm a retired high school English teacher.

MARTIN: And in my experience, high school teachers are just kind of generally good at puzzles. So I have high expectations for you.

CAMORANI: OK, no pressure.

MARTIN: All right, Will. Let's do it.

SHORTZ: All right, Frank and Rachel, every answer today is a word with a double B, like rabbit. Rearrange the letters that I give you to get the words. And here's number one, iron - I-R-O-N - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: OK, so it's a six-letter word?

SHORTZ: Yes.

CAMORANI: Ribbon.

SHORTZ: Ribbon is it. Number two is hays - H-A-Y-S - plus B-B.

CAMORANI: Shabby.

SHORTZ: That's it. Lure - L-U-R-E - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: Burble (laughter).

MARTIN: Burble?

CAMORANI: But they have to be consecutive.

CAMORANI: Oh, oh, rubble.

MARTIN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Rubble is it, good.

CAMORANI: OK.

SHORTZ: Seas. Seas - S-E-A-S - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: Oh, all right. S-E-A-S. Abbess.

SHORTZ: Abbess, good one.

MARTIN: Oh, great.

SHORTZ: Good one. Ogle - O-G-L-E - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: Boggle's going to go out the window there, so gobble.

SHORTZ: Gobble is it. Yowl - Y-O-W-L - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: Yowl. OK. Wobbly.

SHORTZ: Wobbly.

MARTIN: Great.

SHORTZ: Shine - S-H-I-N-E - plus two B's.

CAMORANI: Shine, OK. Nebbish?

SHORTZ: Nebbish. Tough one, you got it.

MARTIN: Woo-hoo. Nice.

SHORTZ: Here's your last one, mulled - M-U-L-L-E-D - like you mulled over The Puzzle - plus two B's. And a slight hint, the answer is something that you are not.

CAMORANI: (Laughter) Maybe I am.

SHORTZ: Starting with a D.

CAMORANI: With a D?

MARTIN: With a D?

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

CAMORANI: Dumb...

SHORTZ: Yeah, yeah.

MARTIN: Dumb, dumb.

CAMORANI: No, double...

SHORTZ: Dumb and then double the B.

MARTIN: Dumble (ph) - what's that word?

SHORTZ: Oh, double the B.

CAMORANI: Dumbled (ph). Dumbled, like Dumbledore (laughter)?

MARTIN: That's not a word.

SHORTZ: No, no, you basically have it.

MARTIN: Dumb, B...

SHORTZ: Yeah.

MARTIN: B-L-E-D.

SHORTZ: Oh, it ends in E-L-L. What does that spell?

MARTIN: Oh, man.

CAMORANI: Dumbbell.

(CROSSTALK)

MARTIN: Oh, that's so mean of you to end it on that because then we do feel like dumbbells.

SHORTZ: (Laughter).

CAMORANI: Yeah, there you go.

MARTIN: But you did excellent, Frank. That was great.

CAMORANI: Why, thanks. That was fun.

MARTIN: Well done. For playing The Puzzle today, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin and puzzle books and games. You can check out your prizes at npr.org/puzzle. And Frank, where do you hear us? What's your public radio station?

CAMORANI: Well, I listen on KNOW in Minneapolis.

MARTIN: Frank Camorani of Edina, Minn. Thanks so much for playing, Frank.

CAMORANI: Thank you. Nice chatting with the both of you.

MARTIN: OK, Will, what's up for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, the challenge comes from listener Martin Eiger, who is a member of the National Puzzlers' League. Think of a phrase that denotes a particular major league sports team in 12 letters. The first six letters are the same as the second six letters rearranged. What team is it? So again, a phrase that denotes a particular major league sports team, 12 letters. The first six are the same as the second six letters rearranged. What team is it?

MARTIN: When you've got the answer, go to npr.org/puzzle and click on that submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for those entries is Thursday, July 14 at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Don't forget to give us your phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, then we'll give you a call and you get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times. And he is WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Mr. Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Rachel.

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