Computer Love: Their 1960s-Era Dating Strategy? Modern Technology! Back in the early '60s a computer dating service decided these two people were compatible. That calculation was right. John and Carol Matlock will celebrate 52 years of marriage in December.
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Computer Love: Their 1960s-Era Dating Strategy? Modern Technology!

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Computer Love: Their 1960s-Era Dating Strategy? Modern Technology!

Computer Love: Their 1960s-Era Dating Strategy? Modern Technology!

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's Friday when we hear from StoryCorps. And today we have a couple who have been together for more than 50 years. The way they met so long ago is surprisingly modern.

JOHN MATLOCK: We met through a computer dating service back in 1964.

INSKEEP: That's John Matlock. In the early '60s, computer dating was a very new idea. Only a handful of services existed, and they used massive computers the size of an entire room to calculate compatibility.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

John and his future wife, Carol, both took a chance on the new technology. They filled out questionnaires about themselves and put them in the mail. Their answers were fed into the computer on a punch card, then they waited for a match.

CAROL MATLOCK: You could have paid for just a year or two years, but I paid for life.

MATLOCK: I don't remember how in the heck I joined, but I was kind of lonely.

MATLOCK: You were in electronics, which is what I was working in, and that's why we were matched together.

MATLOCK: Yeah. I got a packet which included pictures of three different ladies, and yours was one of them. I did call one of the girls - was not successful in getting a date with her. I don't know what her case was. But then I called and talked to you.

MATLOCK: After we'd had several dates, I called the dating service. And I said, you know, I don't think you need to send John any more calls and I don't want any more either. I said, I think that we're for each other. But you didn't know I did this. So I...

MATLOCK: I wondered why the well ran dry.

MATLOCK: That's all that I cared about. It worked. You know, I was a single mother. And like most single mothers, you go to work. You come home. You take care of your child. And so one of the reasons I fell in love with you is because you loved my son and would be willing to accept him as your son.

MATLOCK: I asked to adopt him, and he carries my name.

MATLOCK: To me, that was the most important thing. And we've been together 52 years, December this year.

MATLOCK: And who would have thought enrollment in a computer dating service...

MATLOCK: (Laughter) Would lead to this.

MATLOCK: ...Would've worked out to that?

MATLOCK: We've had a wonderful life together.

MATLOCK: Yeah, we have.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COMPUTER LOVE")

ZAPP: (Singing) Computer love.

MONTAGNE: That's John and Carol Matlock in Portland, Ore. Their interview will be archived at the Library of Congress. Conversations like this one are also part of StoryCorps' new animated series, Who We Are.

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