Sunday Puzzle: The End Remains The Same. All You've Got To Do Is Find It Given the first words of familiar three-word phrases that have "of" in the middle and the same words at the end, find the final word in the phrase.
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The End Remains The Same. All You've Got To Do Is Find It

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The End Remains The Same. All You've Got To Do Is Find It

The End Remains The Same. All You've Got To Do Is Find It

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Rachel Martin, and I'm back after several weeks away from the show. I was covering the political conventions and visiting friends and family, and I missed a whole lot of stuff about being home. But you know what I missed the most? The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: And I am joined by the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Will, I missed you.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: I missed you. Welcome back, Rachel.

MARTIN: Thank you. I am genuinely happy to be back. And, OK, maybe I didn't miss The Puzzle most of all in my life, but, you know, I do miss my weekly dose of puzzling.

SHORTZ: It was there. It was on your list.

MARTIN: Yeah, sure. How's your summer going?

SHORTZ: It's going real well.

MARTIN: Yeah?

SHORTZ: Visiting my sister next weekend in Indiana...

MARTIN: Cool.

SHORTZ: ...And otherwise just suffering the heat.

MARTIN: Yeah, I know. It's that time of year here on the East Coast. OK, remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes, I said name a famous Olympics champion, past or present, first and last names. Remove every letter from the name that appears exactly twice, and the remaining letters, in order, will name certain minerals. Who is this Olympic star? Well, the answer is Michael Phelps, and remove those double letters, you're left with micas.

MARTIN: Cool. Over a thousand people sent in the right answer. And our randomly selected winner this week is Scott Pearl of Wenatchee, Wash. He's on the line now. Hey, Scott. Congratulations.

SCOTT PEARL: Thank you.

MARTIN: Did this come pretty easily to you?

PEARL: Well, considering he's, you know, the most decorated Olympian of all time, it's actually kind of embarrassing how long it took me to get there.

MARTIN: (Laughter).

PEARL: Took me a couple of days. And I was just watching one of his races when I had my aha moment.

MARTIN: Phelps, that guy. And you are a bartender, is that right?

PEARL: I am.

MARTIN: What's your favorite summer cocktail?

PEARL: Oh, that's a good one. Got to go with the strawberry daiquiri.

MARTIN: Strawberry daquiri.

PEARL: I work at a poolside bar, and that's just probably the best warm-weather sipper that I can think of.

MARTIN: I like it. I dig it. I'm a gin-and-tonic girl. But, you know, it's been a long time since I had a strawberry daiquiri. OK. So with that, are you ready to play The Puzzle, Scott?

PEARL: Ready as I'll ever be.

MARTIN: OK, cool. Let's give it a go, Will.

SHORTZ: All right, Scott and Rachel, the phrases peace of mind and state of mind differ only in their first words. Their ends, of mind, are the same. I'm going to give you the first words of other familiar pairs of three-word phrases that have of in the middle and the same words at the end. You tell me the end words. For example, if I said peace and state, you would say mind.

MARTIN: OK.

SHORTZ: All right, number one is facts and quality.

PEARL: Life.

SHORTZ: Facts of life and quality of life, good. Number two is can and diet.

PEARL: Worms?

SHORTZ: Diet of worms, can of worms is right - maid - M-A-I-D - and medal - M-E-D-A-L.

PEARL: Maid of honor, medal of honor?

SHORTZ: That's it - nick - N-I-C-K - and waste - W-A-S-T-E.

PEARL: Nick of time and waste of time?

MARTIN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: That's it - break - B-R-E-A-K - and time.

PEARL: Break and time?

SHORTZ: Yeah.

MARTIN: Break of something.

PEARL: Break of day, time of day?

MARTIN: Oh, good.

SHORTZ: There you go. Good one.

PEARL: OK.

SHORTZ: Wheel and soldier.

PEARL: Wheel of fortune, soldier of fortune.

SHORTZ: That's it - line - L-I-N-E - and ball - B-A-L-L.

PEARL: My mind goes to ball of wax but...

SHORTZ: Yeah. Someone who is just doing a great job, is all fired up, they're a ball of...

MARTIN: Oh, you just said it, Will.

PEARL: Oh, ball of fire?

SHORTZ: I just said the answer (laughter).

MARTIN: (Laughter) Good job, Scott.

SHORTZ: Oh, good job, Will. Good job, Will, yeah (laughter).

PEARL: Yeah (laughter).

SHORTZ: OK, here's your next one.

PEARL: Don't make it too easy on me.

SHORTZ: (Laughter) School and train.

PEARL: School and train?

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

PEARL: School of thought and train of thought?

SHORTZ: That's it, and here's your last one. It's a triple - part, figure and freedom.

PEARL: Part, figure and freedom - speech.

MARTIN: Yep.

SHORTZ: That's it. Good job.

MARTIN: Very well done, Scott. Knocked it out of the park.

PEARL: Thank you.

MARTIN: And for playing The Puzzle today, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin and puzzle books and games. You can read all about your prizes at npr.org/puzzle. And before we let you go, Scott, where do you hear us? What's your public radio station?

PEARL: I hear you at KLWS out of Moses Lake, Wash.

MARTIN: Scott Pearl of Wenatchee, Wash. Hey, Scott, thanks so much for playing The Puzzle.

PEARL: Thank you so much for having me. It was fun.

MARTIN: OK, Will, what's up for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, the challenge comes from listener Kenneth Low of Monterey Park, Calif. Take the name of a country - among its letters is the name of part of the human body, reading from left to right, although not necessarily consecutively. Cross out these letters and the remaining letters, in order, reading left to right, will name part of an animal's body. What country is it? So again name a country. There are some letters in it reading left to right that name part of the human body. Cross out those letters, and the remaining letters, in order, left to right, will name part of an animal's body. What country is it?

MARTIN: You know what to do. When you have figured it out, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please, and our deadline for those entries is Thursday, August 18 at 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Don't forget to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and then you get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and he is WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Rachel.

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