Bill Clinton Campaigns For Hillary At Fayetteville State University Bill Clinton has been tasked with driving up Democratic turnout for Hillary Clinton's campaign. On Wednesday, he was in North Carolina to campaign at a historically black college.
NPR logo

Bill Clinton Campaigns For Hillary At Fayetteville State University

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499554317/499554318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bill Clinton Campaigns For Hillary At Fayetteville State University

Bill Clinton Campaigns For Hillary At Fayetteville State University

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499554317/499554318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In the final days of the presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton has an advantage. It's a list of big-name surrogates now being deployed to motivate core Democratic voters to turn out. That is President Obama's job in a series of campaign appearances, and it's also a job for that other president. NPR's Don Gonyea followed him to North Carolina.

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Last night's stop for Bill Clinton was at the historically black college Fayetteville State University. The crowd gathered outside on a plaza. First, a prayer from Reverend Bryan Thompson.

BRYAN THOMPSON: Now, Lord, as we are in a turbulent season but we can see victory on the horizon...

GONYEA: That victory, he said, would be Hillary Clinton's election. Then, Mayor Pro Tem Mitch Colvin...

MITCH COLVIN: Listen.

GONYEA: ...And a call to see the seriousness of the task at hand.

COLVIN: Don't you realize that your vote is your power? On the one hand, we've got a woman that builds bridges. On the other hand, we've got a maniac that's talking about building walls. Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF MARCHING BAND PLAYING)

GONYEA: The Fayetteville State University marching band then played Clinton onto the stage.

BILL CLINTON: Look, I arranged to be here on homecoming weekend just so I could kind of boogie in to that band.

GONYEA: Then, the pitch.

CLINTON: You are actually being called upon, especially the young people here, to define the terms of what it means to be an American in the 21st century.

GONYEA: On Donald Trump, whom he referred to only as his wife's opponent, Clinton said he knows what Trump means by make America great again. He said it's a false promise to bring back the economy and jobs of 50 years ago.

CLINTON: And then it means I'll give you the position on the social totem pole you had 50 years ago, which means I'll move somebody else down and you up. And that is a very bad idea. Look at this crowd. We are the most diverse, vibrant, big democracy in the world. It's better than it was 50 years ago. Fifty years ago wasn't so hot for African-Americans.

GONYEA: These Bill Clinton rallies aren't big blockbuster events, but he's speaking to Democrats in important corners of key states, hoping it has a ripple effect in each city, town or community he visits.

Don Gonyea, NPR News, Fayetteville.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.