Former KKK Leader David Duke Debates Before Empty Auditorium In New Orleans Debate sponsors barred the public from the forum, angering students protesting Duke's appearance on the campus of Dillard University, a historically black college in New Orleans.
NPR logo

Former KKK Leader David Duke Blames Debate Protests On Black Lives Matter 'Radicals'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500452802/500480164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Former KKK Leader David Duke Blames Debate Protests On Black Lives Matter 'Radicals'

Former KKK Leader David Duke Blames Debate Protests On Black Lives Matter 'Radicals'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500452802/500480164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

At least a few viewers got upset last night watching the World Series because they thought they saw a sign for the KKK in the stands. In truth, that was just a fan's way of celebrating the number of strikeouts, which are marked as K's.

But in New Orleans last night, there was a real debate about the KKK. Protesters turned out as actual former klansman David Duke took part in the U.S. Senate debate. He's in a crowded field and earned enough support in polls to make that debate. NPR's Debbie Elliott was there.

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: Six candidates faced off in an eerily empty auditorium on the campus of Dillard University, a historically black college in New Orleans. Outside, students and other protesters pushed against doors to get into the building.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting) Let us in. Let us in. Let us in.

ELLIOTT: Dillard officials say they didn't know which candidates would be participating when they agreed to rent the hall to Raycom Media, which set the rules for the televised debate. Unlike presidential debates, for instance, this one was closed to the public. Even journalists had to watch a video feed from a side room.

Moments before the debate was set to start, a few people got through a back door. But they were pepper sprayed by police and forced back out. From the debate stage, the former klansman, Duke, blamed the disruption on radicals from the Black Lives Matter movement.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DAVID DUKE: And it is time we stand up now. This is the tipping point. We're getting outnumbered and outvoted in our own nation. Unless...

JOHN SNELL: All right.

DUKE: ...We stand up now...

SNELL: Thank you. Thank you, sir.

DUKE: ...Our children have no future.

ELLIOTT: Duke is one of about two dozen candidates in the contest. Louisiana has an unusual system in which candidates of all parties appear together on the general election ballot. If no one gets a majority, a December runoff between the top two finishers determines the winner.

Having the former KKK grand wizard in the mix stole focus from the issues at several points in the debate, like when Democrat Foster Campbell had to deny allegations from the other Democrat on the stage linking him to David Duke in the past.

FOSTER CAMPBELL: It's not just a lie - it's a damn lie. I have nothing in common with David Duke other than we're probably breathing.

ELLIOTT: Duke's candidacy comes in an election season in which white nationalists have supported Donald Trump in the presidential race. Trump has disavowed Duke support. Yet, Duke fashions himself an ally, ready to fight what he, too, calls a rigged system and take care of Hillary Clinton.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DUKE: The lady should be getting the electric chair, being charged with treason.

ELLIOTT: A former one-term state lawmaker, Duke first gained national attention when he came in second in the 1991 race for Louisiana governor. He lost to Democrat Edwin Edwards in a campaign that featured bumper stickers that said, vote for the crook, arguing a corrupt Governor Edwards was better than a white supremacist. Both men later served time in federal prison.

Duke is not considered competitive in the Louisiana Senate race yet drew some fire from the other candidates, including the front-runner, Republican state Treasurer John Kennedy.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN KENNEDY: Mr. Duke is a convicted felon.

ELLIOTT: Dillard University officials asked students to stay away. One who didn't was political science major Breial Kennedy. She was briefly detained after pushing her way into the building.

BREIAL KENNEDY: They're allowing a terrorist, a neo-Nazi Ku Klux Klan member to be secured in the building in which we paid thousands of dollars to attend annually.

ELLIOTT: Kennedy says she's appalled that such a thing would happen on a historically black campus.

Debbie Elliott, NPR News, New Orleans.

[POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: In a previous version of this story, we said there were bumper stickers during Louisiana's 1991 gubernatorial race that read "Vote for the Crook - It Matters." In fact, they read "Vote for the Crook - It's Important."]

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.