Once Unwelcome News, Her Daughter's Outing Opened Door For A New Love When Leslye Huff first told Mary Ostendorf's mother about their relationship, she took it badly. But things didn't end there. Over a decade, friendship — and even love — bloomed between the three.
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Once Unwelcome News, Her Daughter's Outing Opened Door For A New Love

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Once Unwelcome News, Her Daughter's Outing Opened Door For A New Love

Once Unwelcome News, Her Daughter's Outing Opened Door For A New Love

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Time now to check in with StoryCorps OutLoud, recording conversations about LGBTQ life across America. Today we hear from 79-year-old Mary Ostendorf and her spouse Leslye Huff of East Cleveland, Ohio. They first met in 1983. But like so many LGBTQ people back then, Mary didn't tell her family and Leslye went along with that.

LESLYE HUFF: You took me to meet your mom. I liked her. She was short like me and pretty vivacious. She and I sat and talked. And I thought the makings of a pretty good friendship was beginning.

WERTHEIMER: And at StoryCorps, the couple talked about how they kept their secret until Thanksgiving that year, when they decided it was time to come out to Mary's mom.

MARY OSTENDORF: I was debating whether I would say something at dinner or before dinner. I was still scared.

HUFF: I have to tell you, the closer it got to Thanksgiving, the more I thought - I can't let her come here under those pretenses. So (sighing) I called her on the phone, and I explained the nature of our relationship. It was clear that it was not information that she welcomed. And as it turned out, she didn't come to Thanksgiving dinner.

How did you feel about me having outed you to your mother?

OSTENDORF: It felt like I was walking on hot coals. But I loved you very much. I had made that decision already - that we were forever.

HUFF: Then, she got sick. And I was sitting there one day with her and you were coming from work. And we were looking out the window, and she saw you coming. And that's when I said to her, would you like to live with us? And the smile on her face was just - you know? It was beautiful to see.

I knew that she wanted to make sure that she was with her daughter, but she wasn't sure we would have her. And we made it happen, didn't we?

OSTENDORF: Mm-hm.

HUFF: And I treated your mom like the sassy woman she was. We even danced together. I'd put on music, and she'd get up and dance. I'm holding her 'cause she couldn't balance well. That was how the joy increased. But she had gone from doing quite well...

OSTENDORF: Very well.

HUFF: ...To being almost comatose.

OSTENDORF: The priest came, and he did the last rites. He asked me who that woman is. I said, oh, you mean Leslye? My partner. And my mother heard Leslye - she just perked up. The priest said, you really like Leslye. My mother said, I love Leslye.

HUFF: I loved her, too. We said that love heals the past, the present and the future. And we're proving it every day.

WERTHEIMER: That's Leslye Huff and Mary Ostendorf at StoryCorps in Cleveland, Ohio. Their interview will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress and featured on the StoryCorps podcast. Hear more from the StoryCorps OutLoud series at npr.org.

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