Panel Round Two More questions for the panel...Frappucci-NO, Breaking News, Hide and Sleep, Rubber Chicken
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Panel Round Two

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Panel Round Two

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT, WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We are playing this week with Amy Dickinson, Brian Babylon and Adam Felber. And here again is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Bill lights the menorhyme (ph) in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news. Adam, this year, Starbucks unveiled a new holiday drink. But for some reason, it was only on sale for four days. It was a special frappuccino flavored like what?

ADAM FELBER: Half of Hanukkah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No. Oh, I see, four days. Yes.

FELBER: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The dried fruit apparently clogged the straw.

FELBER: Fruit cake.

SAGAL: Yes, a fruit cake frappuccino.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

FELBER: Yeah. Hey, let's take a holiday favorite that nobody likes and turn it into a beverage.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In yet another attempt to make us go to locally-owned coffeehouses instead...

AMY DICKINSON: (Laughter).

SAGAL: ...Starbucks unveiled the fruitcake frappuccino. It's got green tea and pink fruits, which melt into a festive brown muck.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: Gosh (laughter).

SAGAL: You order...

BRIAN BABYLON: At what point was that even good at the testing kitchen?

FELBER: They must have thought...

SAGAL: You order it by sitting in the lap of barista Claus, telling him what you want and watch him regret majoring in English.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: Oh.

SAGAL: Amy, new research says that when a new iPhone is released, it will become much more likely that you will do what?

DICKINSON: OK, new research shows that when a new iPhone is released...

SAGAL: Yeah.

DICKINSON: ...It's more likely that I will not get it.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: That's just me, right?

SAGAL: Well, you know, it's like, oh, look, the shattered finish is so nice and sparkly.

DICKINSON: Break their old one?

SAGAL: Exactly.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: To accidentally...

DICKINSON: On purpose?

SAGAL: ...Break or drop into the toilet their old phone.

DICKINSON: Oh, just accidentally on purpose.

SAGAL: It just happens. A new study by the American Marketing Association suggests that people may subconsciously attempt to break their iPhones when a new one comes out so they can justify the upgrade. This also explains why mothers with newborn babies start dropping their older kids on the sidewalk.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Amy, Swedish retailer Ikea is cracking down on what illegal activity that has been taking place in their stores lately?

DICKINSON: Something illegal.

SAGAL: You know how much fun it is to stay up late...

DICKINSON: Wait.

SAGAL: ...Eating meatballs and doing each other's hair.

DICKINSON: Like slumber...

SAGAL: Yes.

DICKINSON: ...People sleeping there.

SAGAL: Teenage slumber parties.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

DICKINSON: No.

SAGAL: Yes. All over the world, teenagers are going into Ikea, hiding out in cupboards...

DICKINSON: No.

SAGAL: ...And then jumping out after the store closes to throw slumber parties.

DICKINSON: OK, that sounds like so much fun.

FELBER: Yeah.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know, they jump on beds...

(APPLAUSE)

FELBER: I'm completely in favor of that.

DICKINSON: Oh.

SAGAL: Then they...

FELBER: Kids, if you're out there listening, do that.

DICKINSON: Do that.

BABYLON: Well, you know what?

SAGAL: Then they...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, it started with two kids in Belgium who did it as a prank. And they videoed it and they put it on YouTube, and it became viral, of course. And so people have been imitating it all over the world.

FELBER: It's great.

SAGAL: But what's happening is these teenagers are doing it and they're, haha, we snuck into Ikea. Now we're stuck in an Ikea all night. Oh gosh. Two girls tried it, and they were so terrified of what might happen they never made it out of the cupboard. They stayed in the cupboard all night. They were afraid if they came out they'd either get arrested or end up like everyone else at Ikea, just divorced.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: Oh.

BABYLON: Oh.

SAGAL: Brian, KFC is launching a new accessory to make eating their chicken an even more pleasurable experience. What is it?

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Outside of, like, cocaine sprinkles?

SAGAL: No.

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Wow. I don't know. It makes it more enjoyable?

SAGAL: Yeah. Well, maybe you don't want to lick your fingers. Maybe you want to practice safe chicken eating.

BABYLON: Condoms?

SAGAL: Yes, finger condoms.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

DICKINSON: No. No.

SAGAL: That's right. From now on, Kentucky Fried Chicken is condom-lickin' good.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: No. No.

FELBER: Are you kidding me?

SAGAL: They're called finger nups, and they're a little plastic sleeve that slides over your thumb and your first finger to protect you from the chicken grease. It's 99 percent effective in keeping the grease out.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: In case of condom failure, plan B is a napkin.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: Oh my God.

BABYLON: That's quality writing.

SAGAL: No, it's for people who don't want to get their fingers greasy to then use their phone, you see.

FELBER: It's insanity.

DICKINSON: Oh.

BABYLON: Can I say something?

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: We just laughed at them, but that's smart because if - have - how many of us have been there? It could've been not fried chicken.

FELBER: You get greasy fingers.

BABYLON: And you're in an emergency, trying to - greasy fingers on...

FELBER: You can't put your code in.

DICKINSON: Trying to call your cardiologist and you can't dial.

FELBER: Yeah.

BABYLON: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Exactly when you would need it.

SAGAL: Yeah. Yeah.

BABYLON: Greasy swipes are the worst. Like, if you've ever been on Tinder, swiping with greasy - you're liking stuff you don't like, you're liking what you want. It's horrible.

DICKINSON: That's nasty. That is - that's a gateway to - that's trouble.

SAGAL: I will say that there's been a lot of resistance to the finger condoms, with many KFC customers saying it just feels so much better without them.

(LAUGHTER, SOUNDBITE OF THE METERS' "FUNKY MIRACLE")

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