Round 1 Innovations in car technology: Extra Large Hood Ornaments.
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Round 1

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Round 1

Round 1

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BILL KURTIS: 2016 was also a great year for innovation in tech, as we discussed with our panel back in May.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Adam, one of the biggest safety issues on the road is cars hitting pedestrians, of course. So to make their driverless cars safer, Google has taken out a patent that, if put into effect, will make their cars what?

ADAM FELBER: Sticky.

SAGAL: That's right, Adam.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: And do you know why?

FELBER: Because getting hit by a car is a bad thing, but it's those secondary hits that are really - that'll really mess you up. So Google says, why don't we invent a sticky substance that fits on our bumper so that when we accidentally hit somebody...

FAITH SALIE: We stay there?

FELBER: ...They'll stick there?

SAGAL: Yes. Yes, Adam is exactly right because a lot of injuries are caused not by the initial impact, but by the things that the pedestrians are thrown into, be it...

FELBER: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...Other cars or the street.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Also, it's a cautionary tale, really, for pedestrians after that.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So they - no...

SALIE: Right, 'cause...

POUNDSTONE: The car doesn't pull over right away.

FELBER: No, it parades around town.

SALIE: It's driving around...

POUNDSTONE: Exactly.

SALIE: ...With a person stuck on it like Velcro.

SAGAL: Yeah.

POUNDSTONE: Right.

FELBER: You know, the person stuck to it will have their cell phone in one hand.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It'll be great. You put this on Ubers, they won't have to slow down to pick you up. You just step in front of them. Whoa.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And off you go.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: When we come back, we present the best way to cure your Facebook addiction and we enable your addiction to the "Property Brothers." It's kind of a mixed message. That's all coming up in a minute on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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