'From Being Alone To A Whole Family,' An Iraqi Interpreter's Dream Fulfilled You may remember a 2014 StoryCorps about an Iraqi interpreter living in Minnesota with the help of a U.S. soldier. Three years later, the interpreter's family has finally joined him in the U.S.
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'From Being Alone To A Whole Family,' An Iraqi Interpreter's Dream Fulfilled

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'From Being Alone To A Whole Family,' An Iraqi Interpreter's Dream Fulfilled

'From Being Alone To A Whole Family,' An Iraqi Interpreter's Dream Fulfilled

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  • Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In today's StoryCorps, we hear of the journey of an Army interpreter and his family, a journey from Iraq to Minnesota. American soldiers nicknamed this interpreter Philip because he loved Philip Morris cigarettes. And he kept that name once he came to the United States. His immigration was sponsored by a sergeant in the company with which he had worked - Paul Braun. And Braun and Philip first came to StoryCorps in 2014.

PAUL BRAUN: Do you remember the first day that we met?

PHILIP MORRIS: Oh, you scared me, dude, your attitude in the beginning and with your mohawk.

BRAUN: (Laughter) I scared everybody with that mohawk.

MORRIS: You told me if you try to mess with my soldier, I will shoot you.

BRAUN: And what did you do?

MORRIS: I was smiling at you (laughter).

BRAUN: You smiled at me and said some day we will be able to laugh about this conversation while we're drinking tea. And that's when I knew I think this guy will be OK. And my Iraqi interpreter became my American brother.

MORRIS: And my American soldier became my Iraqi brother.

INSKEEP: As a former interpreter, Philip's life was in constant danger in Iraq. And although he managed to make his way to the United States, his wife and four children did not until, after three years of trying, their visas were approved. They arrived in Minnesota three months ago, along with Philip's nephew Andy who also served as an interpreter for the U.S. Philip and Andy recently spoke at StoryCorps.

MORRIS: You know, I still remember the date and the time when the embassy emailed me saying, congratulation, your family can come any minute now. We had the visa. I was, like, shocked.

ANDY: What were you feeling when you first saw me in the airport?

MORRIS: Oh, my God, I was like all of sudden start clapping and jumping, saying, ahlan wa sahlan, welcome. I'm so happy to see you.

ANDY: You have been here for three years. What was the hardest thing to adjust to in the U.S.?

MORRIS: As immigrant who come from completely different culture, you will see the people here, like, most of them, they are nicely, friendly, and they respect your religion, your background. But, you know, I work as a caregiver in senior home. So one day, one of my residents, he start calling me racist names. But we start talking, and one year later, he said I'm sorry. Philip, you changed my mind. You know, when I remember my last couple years, like, working by myself here, I used to work, like, four different jobs. And in the end of the day, go home, there is no one waiting for you.

ANDY: Yeah.

MORRIS: That's hard feeling.

ANDY: Yeah.

MORRIS: So from being alone to a whole family with my best friend and nephew with me, what do I need more?

ANDY: Yeah.

MORRIS: That's it.

INSKEEP: Two former Iraqi interpreters for the United States, Philip and Andy, at StoryCorps in Minneapolis. Their conversation was recorded in December and will be archived at the Library of Congress. You can hear more from Philip on the StoryCorps podcast found at npr.org.

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