Fowl Musician Doesn't Need Chicken Fingers To Play Keyboard Jokgu the chicken uses her beak to tap out "America The Beautiful." Shannon Meyers says it took about two weeks for Jokgu to learn. For more on Jokgu's work, check out her band: The Flockstars.
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Fowl Musician Doesn't Need Chicken Fingers To Play Keyboard

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Fowl Musician Doesn't Need Chicken Fingers To Play Keyboard

Fowl Musician Doesn't Need Chicken Fingers To Play Keyboard

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513196763/513196766" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with this beautiful anthem brought to you by...

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

GREENE: ...A chicken. Yes, that is Jokgu the chicken using her beak to tap out "America The Beautiful." Her owner, Shannon Meyers, says it took about two weeks for Jokgu to learn this. She especially likes the symbolism of a Chinese-breed chicken with a Korean name rocking out to an American anthem. And for more of Jokgu's work, you can check out her band, The Flockstars. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Good girl, Jokgu.

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