Letters: A Child with a Gun; Journalism; Banjos Debbie Elliott reads from listeners' e-mail. There's a comment on The Ethicist's response to a man who saw a child carrying what looked like a gun. There are also thoughts on "he said/she said" journalism and a banjo exhibit.
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Letters: A Child with a Gun; Journalism; Banjos

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Letters: A Child with a Gun; Journalism; Banjos

Letters: A Child with a Gun; Journalism; Banjos

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DEBBIE ELLIOTT, host:

Time now to read from some of your letters. Many listeners objected to ethicist Randy Cohen's advise to the Indiana man who saw a child carrying what looked like a gun on a school playing field. Greg Davis wrote from Lexington, Kentucky to say, The only safe, wise and ethical course for the gentleman would have been to call police, advising them of his concern and asking for them to check on the child. It is what the police are trained to do.

In last week's interview with the Salazar brothers on Capitol Hill, Congressman John Salazar said he supports an agricultural guest worker program because many Americans have lost the will to do hard farm labor. Bob Warner of Briny Breezes, Florida, replies, I for one would love to work in the fields everyday to fulfill my desire to be close to the earth, but unfortunately our economic structure demands otherwise, if I'm to have a decent roof over my head.

Listener Cassandra Marshall wrote to us in response to NPR ombudsmen Jeffrey Dvorkin's essay on balance in journalism. Mr. Dvorkin is to be commended for trying to grapple with the state of he said, she said journalism, she wrote. However, he is wrong to say that it is blogs that have turned heads towards more commentary by reporters. Reporters, especially the national political reporters, have for quite some time attempted to up the value of their work by providing commentary in many media. They ought to decide if they are reporters or commentators and stop doing both.

And finally, Debbie Doltner Delaeir(ph) had this to say about our piece on Picturing the Banjo, an exhibit at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art. I cringe now whenever I think of my family crowding around the television set in the 60s to watch the black-and-white minstrel show. I never thought of this program as demeaning at the time. Now, as an adult, I have eyes to see and ears to hear, and I choose to love and respect my fellow man no matter what race, color or creed.

Your letters are always welcome. To write to us, go to our website npr.org. Click on Contact Us and select WEEKEND ALL THING CONSIDERED. Please tell us where you live, include a phone number and how to pronounce your name.

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