Sunday Puzzle: BBC, Do You Know What It Stands For? Weekend Edition puzzle master Will Shortz puts NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro, challenge winner Muriel Kranowski, and Roy Wood Jr. of The Daily Show to the test this week with a BBC-themed puzzle.
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Sunday Puzzle: BBC, Do You Know What It Stands For?

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Sunday Puzzle: BBC, Do You Know What It Stands For?

Sunday Puzzle: BBC, Do You Know What It Stands For?

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Lordy, it's been a busy week here in D.C. but, of course, the real news headline this week is the puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining me, as always, is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master. Will, good morning.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK, remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener David Herbst of Inverness, Calif. I said, name a well-known U.S. city with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the last name of a famous 20th century writer. And the first word is something found in virtually every work of this author. Name the city and the author. Well, the city is Corpus Christi, Texas.

That last word, Christi, sounds like the Christie of Agatha Christie. And the first word is corpus, which is a body, especially a dead one, so Corpus Christi. And I tell you, a lot of solvers sent in an interesting alternative, St. Louis, referring to C.S. Lewis, who wrote religious works. And some of his works may have included saints, so it was interesting.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. This week, we got more than 850 responses. And our winner is Muriel Kranowski of Blacksburg, Va. Congratulations.

MURIEL KRANOWSKI: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So, Muriel, how'd you come up with the answer?

KRANOWSKI: It just came to me immediately as soon as I heard it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) You heard it in your head.

KRANOWSKI: Yeah.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, what do you do in Blacksburg?

KRANOWSKI: I'm retired. I used to be a computer programmer at Virginia Tech.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Awesome. We always like to hear women in programming. And do you have a question for Will?

KRANOWSKI: I do. The New York Times crossword puzzle fairly often includes the names of living people, and the clues are the solutions. Do people lobby you to be included in a puzzle? And do you ever accede to those requests?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Will, include me.

SHORTZ: I will think about that, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So the answer's yes.

SHORTZ: Last week, Liane Hansen had her name in the puzzle but she did not have to lobby me. It has happened a couple of times where sort of semi-famous actors or somebody send me their resumes, which I think is hilarious. But no, I don't take lobbying for appearances in the crossword.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, bummer. And I thought I had an in. All right, we also have a very special guest who's here too, Roy Wood Jr. Hey, Roy.

ROY WOOD JR.: How are you all?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We are awesome. How are you?

SHORTZ: I'm good. You know what? Let me go ahead and just delete this draft email that I was going to send to Will with my semi-famous resume.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, let me say your semi-famous resume is not so semi-famous. You are, of course, on Comedy Central as a correspondent on "The Daily Show" with Trevor Noah. Do you, you know, play puzzles?

WOOD JR.: I am a Sudoku devotee of Will.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK.

WOOD JR.: And I'm a jigsaw puzzle guy. Those are my two things, jigsaw, Sudoku and video games.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Let me just ask you something. You're a comedian. Do you think there's just too much material right now? Is it just like too much?

WOOD JR.: It's too much of one type of material. You know, it's like going to a buffet restaurant and they just go all we have is steak.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Cooked really well.

WOOD JR.: And it's orange. And you can help yourself to it.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Muriel, here is how this is going to work. Roy is your lifeline. If you need hints or help, he's your man. Are you guys ready to play the puzzle?

KRANOWSKI: I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Roy, are you ready?

WOOD JR.: I'm very prepared.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right (laughter). That's good. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Muriel and Roy. Today's puzzle is called BBC, as in the British media giant. I'm going to give you two words starting with B. You give me a word starting with C that can complete each of my two words to finish a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

For example, if I said Bob and Burmese, you would say cat, referring to a bobcat and a Burmese cat. Number one, and we're starting with three-letter answers. Your first one is baseball and bottle.

KRANOWSKI: Cap.

SHORTZ: Cap is right. Number two is buzz budget.

KRANOWSKI: Is that buzz?

SHORTZ: B-U-Z-Z.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Roy, you got any tips?

WOOD JR.: Yeah. Our administration often has done this to our budget.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

KRANOWSKI: Oh, cut.

SHORTZ: Budget cut, very good.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was a good one.

KRANOWSKI: It was.

SHORTZ: Good hint. All right. Now we're on a four-letter answers now. Bar building.

KRANOWSKI: Code.

SHORTZ: Code, good. Now, five-letter answers. Booster basic.

KRANOWSKI: Cable.

SHORTZ: There you go, booster cable, basic cable. Basketball bankruptcy.

KRANOWSKI: Court.

SHORTZ: That's it. All right, now a six-letter answer. Body brownie. Six letters.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It is something that that the police are now required to wear.

KRANOWSKI: Oh, camera.

SHORTZ: That's it, body camera and a brownie camera. And here's your last one.

KRANOWSKI: OK.

SHORTZ: It's a seven-letter answer. Bean - B-E-A-N - and bargain.

KRANOWSKI: OK. Counter.

SHORTZ: Bean counter and bargain counter. Nice job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Muriel, you did a really great job. Thank you so much for playing the puzzle. What is your member station?

KRANOWSKI: It's WVTF in Roanoke.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. Thanks so much.

KRANOWSKI: Oh, thank you very much. It was fun.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And Roy, thank you for coming on and coming by our studios, too. What do you got going on this summer?

WOOD JR.: Oh, well, we will be working hard, hard, hard away at "The Daily Show," so just check us out - Comedy Central, Monday through Thursdays at 11 p.m.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go, you got your plug. All right.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Will, what's the next challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. Consider this sentence - Benjamin the Greenpeace ombudsman in the panorama was charmed by the chinchilla fragrance. Now, this sentence contains seven words of seven or more letters. They have something very unusual in common. What is it? And can you think of an eighth word with the same property?

So here it is again - Benjamin the Greenpeace ombudsman in the panorama was charmed by the chinchilla fragrance. There are seven words in there with seven or more letters. They have something very unusual in common. What is it? And what's an eighth word with the same property?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Roy, do you have any suggestions for this puzzle?

SHORTZ: (Laughter) Good luck on that.

WOOD JR.: Ooh (ph).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Ooh, it's hard. When you have the answer, go to our website - npr.org/puzzle - and click on the submit your answer link, just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, June 15 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time.

If you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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