Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters : All Tech Considered A new social media app lets you think that you're liking, commenting and sharing an infinite list of random posts. But "it's all meaningless," Binky creator Dan Kurtz says. And that's the point.
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Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

OK, do you ever feel like social media apps are just a waste of time?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Yes.

MARTIN: Now there's an app for that.

DAN KURTZ: Binky is just as meaningless as other social media apps, but it's upfront about it.

INSKEEP: Dan Kurtz created Binky, a tool to wean you off social media and shield you from the worst of it.

KURTZ: It features all of the standard widgets of social media, liking and leaving comments and swiping left and right, but it doesn't give you any of the anxiety that you get from scrolling through actual content.

MARTIN: Instead of bad news or pictures of people living better lives than you, Binky promises, quote, "an infinite list of random stuff." You can post comments called binks. You could like things, swiping left or right.

INSKEEP: But none of this is connected to anyone you know or connected to anyone at all. Kurtz says it offers a kind of freedom.

KURTZ: The freedom to satisfy the appetite that you have for scrolling through stuff without needing to worry about any of the consequences because it's all meaningless. Nothing does anything.

MARTIN: Nothing does anything. Kurtz says his inspiration came after he scrolled through his social media feed one day, then realized he couldn't remember any of the content. He got to thinking.

KURTZ: Does that mean that, like, nothing that I'm seeing on Facebook actually matters? If I replaced all of the stuff that I'm seeing with just random photos of chairs and condiments, would that be just as compelling? It turns out the answer is yes.

INSKEEP: This is kind of existential crisis - yes, for him, yes, for thousands of others. Kurtz says Binky's popularity took him by surprise.

(SOUNDBITE OF GOGO PENGUIN'S "QUIET MIND")

MARTIN: Now he says he plans to improve his meaningless, anti-social media app, perhaps making it even more meaningless.

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