Jerry Moran, The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill "I am a product of rural Kansas," Sen. Jerry Moran said earlier this month. "I understand the value of a hospital in your community, of a physician in your town, of a pharmacy on Main Street."
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The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill

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The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill

The Loyal Republican Senator From Kansas Who Helped Kill The Health Care Bill

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Kansas Senator Jerry Moran usually keeps a low profile. But last night, Moran helped sink the Republican health care bill when he tweeted out his opposition. Jim McLean of member station KCUR was outside of Moran's office in Kansas today. A group of liberals had gathered there to thank the senator.

LESLIE MARK: Good morning, Kansans.

(CHEERING)

MARK: We are here this morning to press our case to Congress.

JIM MCLEAN, BYLINE: About 50 people joined Indivisible KC organizer Leslie Mark outside the suburban Kansas City bank that houses Senator Moran's office.

MARK: But I want beforehand to say thank you, Senator Jerry Moran.

(APPLAUSE, CHEERING)

MCLEAN: But about 10 minutes later, Twitter struck again. This time it was a reporter in Washington saying that Moran would still vote to help the Obamacare repeal process along. The news came just as Elise Higgins of Planned Parenthood was getting the bullhorn.

ELISE HIGGINS: Well, that changes my speech a little.

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: All right. How many of you are still fired up?

(CHEERING)

HIGGINS: I'm sorry - one more time because I'm not totally sure that Moran's staff heard you. Are you fired up?

(CHEERING)

HIGGINS: That's right.

MCLEAN: Mark Wiebe works for the MainStream Coalition, a group that helps centrist candidates. He attended all of the town hall meetings that Moran held in the far western part of the state over the July Fourth recess. Wiebe says after the last meeting, Moran talked to him about the pressure he was under from Republican leaders.

MARK WIEBE: On this issue, I think he's going to end up and do the right thing. Although it might be a twisty-turny path to get there.

MCLEAN: Wiebe says the right thing would be for Moran to work with Democrats to fix Obamacare, not repeal it. For NPR News, I'm Jim McLean in Olathe, Kan.

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