PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars This year's Concours features 204 of the best cars that have ever been made. The 67th annual event caps off a week of intensive, obsessive car love in Monterey Peninsula, Calif.
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PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars

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PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars

PHOTOS: Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Showcases Most Exotic, Rare, Expensive Cars

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544898397/544978511" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

If you want to see or perhaps purchase the most exotic, rare and expensive automobiles in the world, then you need to head to the Monterey Peninsula in California. The Concours d'Elegance on the famous Pebble Beach golf course is where hundreds of the wealthiest car collectors show off and sometimes sell their cars. NPR's Sonari Glinton filed this report from the show.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: As a car reporter, I go to a lot of car shows. But none is quite like the Concours d'Elegance here at Pebble Beach. I'm standing right on the cart path at the first hole, watching a parade of Ferraris drive by.

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GLINTON: Tell me your name.

JEFF MOSING: Jeff Mosing from Austin, Texas.

GLINTON: And is this your car?

MOSING: It is. I've had it for about two years now. This one came up for sale in Houston. I'm out of Austin. And it was the right car for me, so I picked it up.

GLINTON: What do you mean, it was the right car for you? How is it possible that Ferrari is the right car for you? Come on.

MOSING: When you see a car, and there's a gut feeling - just like if you meet somebody, you know, that you've never known before - that you know that there's something there. This was - I definitely had a connection with this car.

GLINTON: You're like - you looked at this car. And you're like, we can be friends.

MOSING: Yeah. Yeah.

GLINTON: (Laughter).

MOSING: It just takes a big check. But, yeah, we can be friends.

GLINTON: How big is that check?

MOSING: These cars right now are trading anywhere from 1.3 to 1.5.

(SOUNDBITE OF REVVING ENGINE)

GLINTON: That's million dollars. Cars here go for 30 times that. Classics, antiques, concept cars, Lamborghinis Porsches, Corvettes, oh my. Car fans spend hundreds of dollars for the privilege of being on this golf course with the rarest cars dotting the fairway. There are men and women in their Sunday finest in hats with parasols. Fans like Paula Blair (ph) came here from Dallas.

PAULA BLAIR: Well, I started off as somebody who really wasn't interested in a car. I've totally changed to becoming what I call a minor car person, somebody who just likes the look of them - versus other people, who like the look of THEM so much they start collecting one and two and three, twenty and forty.

(SOUNDBITE OF REVVING ENGINE)

BLAIR: And then there's that. I love the noise of a vehicle. Oh, my gosh. These new electric cars with no noise - they're losing out. They've got to put that wonderful, wonderful sound in there. Listen to that. That was great.

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GLINTON: Could you do me a favor and introduce yourself?

SANDRA BUTTON: I'm Sandra Button, chairman of the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. You know, this is my 32nd year. So it's been more than half my life. And if you love cars, and you do car events all year round, it kind of becomes your life.

GLINTON: Now, she's become one of the most prominent women in the car business. But still...

BUTTON: They'll call my husband instead of me because it's like a guy talk thing. I'm like - and I don't really care because as long as a great car gets to Pebble Beach, if they want to talk to my husband instead of me, that's fine. But, ultimately - and he'll even say so - you know, you've got to talk to the boss.

GLINTON: And with self-driving and electric cars in our future, I had to ask.

Are Pebble Beach's days numbered? That's the question.

BUTTON: When you think about it - I mean, if you go all the way back to the days of the horse and carriage - right? - people don't need horses in the same way we used to. I mean, everybody used to really need their horse. And there's still horse shows, and there's still places to race them or to hunter jump from or whatever people do. You know, it may turn out that way - that, you know, we're going to have great places to enjoy our cars but not in the everyday way.

GLINTON: That's because the future will come to Pebble Beach eventually. From the 18th hole, Sonari Glinton, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF BRONTIDE'S "KNIVES")

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