The Sounds Of Failure In this round, our contestants succeed by failing as they're quizzed on the sounds you hear when you lose or die in various games.
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The Sounds Of Failure

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The Sounds Of Failure

The Sounds Of Failure

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Next, we'll play a game about the sound of failure. Let's check in with our contestants. Tamar, in addition to your work as a structural engineer, you sing in a Jewish a capella choir. Or you did in college?

TAMAR CAPLAN: I did in college, yes.

EISENBERG: And you got to perform in some pretty good places?

CAPLAN: We did. We performed at a number of pretty good places.

EISENBERG: OK. Any standouts?

CAPLAN: We got to perform at the White House for the Obamas.

EISENBERG: Oh, yeah, that might be a favorite.

(APPLAUSE)

CAPLAN: Yeah.

EISENBERG: What was the circumstance?

CAPLAN: The Hanukkah party that the White House throws every year.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

CAPLAN: We were invited to be sort of the entrance entertainment for that. So we stood in the entryway and watched famous Jewish people walk past us.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Is there any other kind?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And what were you singing?

CAPLAN: We were singing a number of songs - some from our typical repertoire, some holiday-specific stuff that we learned for that.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

CAPLAN: And part of it was a - we got to do a personal meet-and-greet with the Obamas, which involved sort of a one-minute snippet of a song that we got to perform for them.

EISENBERG: And what was the one-minute snippet?

BREE FOWLER: We did a mash up of a traditional Hanukkah holiday song and Katy Perry's "Firework." So...

(LAUGHTER)

FOWLER: ...So Michelle Obama sang along with us.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: That's pretty cool.

FOWLER: And Ruth Bader Ginsburg was chilling in the doorway because if anybody can crash a private concert for the Obamas, it's Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: She just lurked in a doorway and then...

FOWLER: (Laughter) Yeah.

EISENBERG: Bree, you write about security, hackers and privacy rights for consumer reports. So can you tell us about Internet security and how should we protect ourselves?

FOWLER: Well, I mean, a lot of it comes down to like basic common sense. Your password should not be password (laughter). And, you know, I mean, people are so worried about the NSA reading their mind. But yet, they put everything on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter and - you know?

EISENBERG: Yeah. We're ruining our own privacy, right?

FOWLER: Yeah. I mean, you know, why worry about somebody reading your mind when you're walking around with no pants on? You know, that's basically what it boils down to.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It is...

JONATHAN COULTON: Story of my life, Bree.

EISENBERG: It is funny when people, like, you know, they know where we are. It's like, well, you just checked in.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. Let's go to your next game. It's about sounds you hear when you lose or die. Tamar, what is your least favorite sound?

CAPLAN: Pigeons on my window sill in the mornings.

EISENBERG: Yeah, right. Vermin trying to get into your home. Bree, what's your least favorite sound?

FOWLER: I'd say it's a tie between anything my kids say or do before 7 am on a Saturday and people who chew gum in elevators.

EISENBERG: We're going to edit that so it just is like, anything my kids say. That's what...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So this is an audio quiz called the Sounds Of Failure. We'll play a sound effect you'd hear when you failed at a game. You just tell me the name of the videogame, tabletop game or game show the sound comes from. So, Bree, you won the last game, so you win this and you are off to the final round. Tamar, you need to win this or we're going to gong show you out of here. Here we go. Here's your first sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Tamar.

CAPLAN: Is that "The Price Is Right"?

EISENBERG: Sure is. Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: They have a whole orchestra - right? - live every show.

COULTON: They have like 10 horns. It's fantastic.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. How about this?

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Bree.

FOWLER: "Super Mario."

EISENBERG: I'm sorry. That is incorrect. Tamar, can you steal?

CAPLAN: "Pac-Man"?

EISENBERG: That is Pac-Man dying, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Although, can Pac-Man die if he's surrounded by ghosts?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: And if he does, what's it matter? He's just going to come back as a ghost. Apparently, ghosts are real. Problem solved.

EISENBERG: Yeah. It gets weird. Here's your next fail.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Tamar.

CAPLAN: Jenga?

EISENBERG: Yeah. That's Jenga.

CAPLAN: (Laughter).

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's a Jenga tower falling.

CAPLAN: Sure.

EISENBERG: Have you ever played Jenga?

CAPLAN: I have.

COULTON: Sounds just like that.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

CAPLAN: You're correct. I just - I was - I wish Jenga had a, like, a built-in sound effect.

EISENBERG: That was it.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. How about this one?

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Tamar.

CAPLAN: Bop It?

EISENBERG: Bop It, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: If you don't know, Bop It is a handheld electronic game that's sort of - it's like Simon says, but it just tells you to do things, right? It just yells at you things to do...

CAPLAN: Basically.

EISENBERG: ...Until you make that sound - the scream.

CAPLAN: Well, until it makes that sound. But you might make that sound also.

EISENBERG: Yeah, right. All right, here's a tough one.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Bree.

FOWLER: Mario.

EISENBERG: Good guess. I'm sorry. That is incorrect. Tamar, can you steal?

CAPLAN: Super Mario.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like what you guys did there. That's the sound of the dog laughing when you don't shoot any ducks in "Duck Hunt."

CAPLAN: Oh.

EISENBERG: I know. I know. All right, what's this from?

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Tamar.

CAPLAN: Family Feud.

EISENBERG: Good answer. Good answer.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And this is your last clue.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECT)

EISENBERG: Tamar walked away and made sure Bree could ring in for that one. What do you got, Bree?

FOWLER: Yeah. That's "Super Mario."

EISENBERG: Yeah. That is "Super Mario Brothers."

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

ART CHUNG: There's no failure in that game. Tamar, congratulations, you won that game.

(APPLAUSE)

CHUNG: So you each won a game, which means we're going to a quick game three. I'll give you a category, and you go back and forth naming things that fall into that category. The first contestant to mess up will be eliminated. You need to buzz in to answer first. Here's your category. Name the 10 U.S. states that most recently joined the union.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

CHUNG: Bree, you're first.

FOWLER: Hawaii.

CHUNG: Correct. Tamar.

CAPLAN: California.

CHUNG: No. I'm sorry, that is incorrect. The other answers were - Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Tamar, we're sorry to see you go. So that means, Bree, you're headed to the final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Coming up, we'll find out who will face off against Bree in our final round. And we'll find out at least 10 things we love about our special guest Julia Stiles. I'm Ophira Eisenberg. And this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF LCD SOUNDSYSTEM'S "OTHER VOICES")

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