After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades.
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After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

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After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Puerto Rico might want to look north - far north - for one solution to its infrastructure problems. Alaska's remote communities have had to power themselves for decades. One has managed to do that almost entirely on renewable energy. Rachel Waldholz of Alaska's Energy Desk explains.

RACHEL WALDHOLZ, BYLINE: Kodiak, Alaska, is one of the busiest fishing ports in the country. And it smells like it. The waterfront is lined with seafood plants. At the Ocean Beauty plant, James Turner gives a tour of the slime line.

JAMES TURNER: So we call it the slime line 'cause it's a wet environment.

WALDHOLZ: Inside, it's a maze of conveyor belts. There are canning machines, pressure cookers, freezers. The power for all of that is generated right here on the island, mostly from a hydro dam. But 10 years ago, Kodiak had a problem. It was relying more and more on diesel generators, and diesel prices were sky high and unpredictable. Jennifer Richcreek works for the Kodiak Electric Association, the local utility.

JENNIFER RICHCREEK: When you have that threat of a diesel bill hanging over your head every month, that is very motivating to find solutions.

WALDHOLZ: So the utility set a goal of 95 percent renewable power. They installed six wind turbines and a bank of batteries, and that worked pretty well. But then there was a new challenge at the Kodiak port.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

RICK KNIAZIOWSKI: Make sure your hardhats are on pretty tight. It gets a little windy.

WALDHOLZ: I am standing way out on the arm of a shipping crane with Rick Kniaziowski. He works for the shipping company Matson. This crane is giant, taller than anything else in sight. And it's electric, a big power hog. If I look down, I can watch the operator lift a container off the cargo ship.

Wow, this is so cool (laughter).

Every time it does that, it causes a spike in demand on the power grid. That's why back when Kniaziowski first asked the head of the local utility about getting this crane, the answer was no.

KNIAZIOWSKI: His eyes got really big and he's like, I just don't see it, Rick. Everyone's TVs are going to brown out, and they're going to either hate you or they're going to hate us.

WALDHOLZ: But the utility found a European company that offered a new kind of energy storage - a flywheel. There are two here now, and they look - well, they look like a couple of trailers behind a chain-link fence. But inside they're pretty sci-fi. There's a massive chunk of spinning steel. I'll let Richcreek explain.

RICHCREEK: It's in a frictionless vacuum chamber hovered by magnets, which is so cool.

WALDHOLZ: The flywheel stores energy as motion and then pumps it out the second a big surge is needed. Kodiak is one of the first places in the world to use a flywheel this way. Altogether, the microgrid on this island operates like an orchestra, each piece watching the rest, responding automatically, millisecond by millisecond. The wind drops suddenly and the flywheel kicks on. As the flywheel slows, the batteries step in. And behind it all, the hydro ramps up. Richcreek says this is the future.

RICHCREEK: The solutions are out there. They're outside the box. They may be different. But the industry is changing.

WALDHOLZ: The system has drawn interest from around the world, and Kodiak hopes other American communities will take notice, too. For NPR News, I'm Rachel Waldholz in Kodiak, Alaska.

MCEVERS: That story comes to us from Alaska's Energy Desk. It's a public media collaboration focused on energy and the environment.

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