Rhymes With Orange Contestants are challenged to a quiz about obscure words that rhyme with famously unrhymable words.
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Rhymes With Orange

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Rhymes With Orange

Rhymes With Orange

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Hey, Jonathan.

JONATHAN COULTON: Hi, Ophira.

EISENBERG: We're in Orlando, home to some of the country's most popular theme parks, so - Theme Park Trivia speed round. What's the roller coaster in Disney World's Tomorrowland?

COULTON: That is Space Mountain.

EISENBERG: Yes, of course. At Universal Studios, where can you find butterbeer, Gringotts bank and Ollivanders wand shop?

COULTON: That's Diagon Alley.

EISENBERG: Exactly. And when it reopens, what will be the scariest attraction in Orlando?

COULTON: Oh, Hall of Presidents.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: From NPR and WNYC, coming to you from a Hard Rock Live in Orlando, Fla., it's NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and trivia - ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm Jonathan Coulton. Now here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: Thank you, Jonathan. We have a great show for you. Four brilliant contestants will play our nerdy games - that is, if they make it through Universal CityWalk security in time. And whoever does will be our big winner.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It is great to be back in Orlando, and I think a little theme park magic is exactly what this New Yorker needs right now. I love the friendly people, and I'm cool with the fact that they're being paid to be nice. I like the reliable public transportation, even if it's a monorail. I like that Spider-Man actually looks like Spider-Man, not that off brand one that is spelled with a y. It's a sparkling, clean kingdom ruled by a princess, and here, I am royalty too. Thank you, FastPass.

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: And I'm very excited to talk to our special guest. She's the best-selling author of "Bad Feminist," and her latest book, "Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body," is available now. Roxane Gay will be joining us.

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: Our first two contestants will play a game called Rhymes With Orange. Let's meet them. First up, Beth Love on buzzer No. 1.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You recently started a small business making men's ballroom dance pants. Welcome.

BETH LOVE: Thank you. Glad to be here.

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Kristen Merek on buzzer No. 2.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're a standardized test tutor. Welcome.

KRISTEN MEREK: Thanks. I'm mostly just hoping to not embarrass myself tonight.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Yelling) Woo (ph).

EISENBERG: Beth and Kristen, the first of you who wins two of our games will move on to our final round. So Florida is famous for oranges, and the word orange is famous for having no perfect rhyme - or does it? In this game, every answer is a word that is difficult to rhyme. But there is indeed one obscure word out there that rhymes with it.

COULTON: So for example, if I said, when I'm enjoying the view at Blorenge, I love to snack on a delicious - you would buzz in and say, orange.

EISENBERG: If you get that answer right, for a bonus point, you must guess the definition of the obscure rhyming word. In this case, Blorenge is the name of a hill in Wales.

COULTON: Sure. Everyone knows that.

EISENBERG: Everyone knows that.

COULTON: It's my favorite hill in Wales.

EISENBERG: When I go to Wales, I make sure I...

COULTON: Which hill are you going to?

EISENBERG: Oh, Blorenge.

COULTON: I guess Blorenge.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK, here we go. A dirty movie theater covered in pilm is not a great place to watch a...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Beth.

LOVE: Film?

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: For a bonus point, what does pilm mean?

LOVE: Pilm - like, maybe that cellophane bits that comes off the candy bar boxes.

EISENBERG: That's so specific. I love that.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Art Chung, how do you feel about that answer?

ART CHUNG: I'm afraid we can't accept that. We're just looking for dust.

LOVE: Aw.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I feel like this is one of those moments where, like, you are better than what we have.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Yeah, we're not as smart as you think, Beth.

EISENBERG: (Laughter) Yeah, exactly.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: My grandma's walk is more a hurple, so she's got a cane that's colored...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Beth.

LOVE: Purple.

COULTON: That is correct.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: For a bonus point, do you know what hurple means?

LOVE: Crooked?

COULTON: It's close. It's actually - it's a Scottish word for a limp or a hobble.

EISENBERG: Hmm.

COULTON: I know.

EISENBERG: I know.

COULTON: It's a bad beat - bad beat, Beth.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Our police crest contains a gyron. When we come for you, you'll hear a...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Kristen.

MEREK: Siren?

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's correct.

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: For a bonus point, what does a gyron mean?

MEREK: Something that also makes a loud noise? (Laughter).

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's a good guess. Gyron is a triangular shape on a shield or a coat of arms.

MEREK: Learn something new every day.

EISENBERG: There you go. But did you? But did you?

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I know. These words are never going to come up again, is the thing.

EISENBERG: Yes, this is it.

COULTON: On my farm, a newborn chilver gets a bell made out of...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Beth.

LOVE: Silver?

COULTON: Silver is the answer.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: For a bonus point, what's a chilver?

LOVE: Some kind of a farm animal.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Can you be more specific?

LOVE: A camel?

COULTON: That's...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I'm sorry, it's not a camel. A chilver is a young female lamb.

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: Aw.

COULTON: I know, right? Adorable.

EISENBERG: I know. Fill up with water that is Rhenish if you're in Liechtenstein and need to...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Beth.

LOVE: Replenish?

EISENBERG: That is correct, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right, for that bonus point, what do you think Rhenish means?

LOVE: Rhenish - from the Renaissance fair.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Incorrect, but I'm giving you the point.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It is actually relating to the Rhine River. Yeah.

COULTON: When the kids got lost inside a naos, the field trip erupted into...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Kristen.

MEREK: Chaos.

COULTON: It sure did.

MEREK: As do most things with children.

COULTON: Yes, that's right. For a bonus point, what does naos mean?

MEREK: The particular stress felt by any field trip chaperone.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I like that you made it in - a very emotional question.

COULTON: Yeah. A naos is an ancient temple, it says on this piece of paper. I don't know.

MEREK: Oh, a great place to take children.

EISENBERG: I know. Puzzle guru Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

CHUNG: They both did great. Beth, well done. You're one step closer to our final round.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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