How Unicorns Help This 8-Year-Old Deal With Bullies Anna Freeman's 8-year-old daughter, Brianna, is obsessed with unicorns. She explains to her mother how the imaginary creatures relate to real experiences in her life.
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How Unicorns Help This 8-Year-Old Deal With Bullies

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How Unicorns Help This 8-Year-Old Deal With Bullies

How Unicorns Help This 8-Year-Old Deal With Bullies

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  • Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That music, of course, means it is time for StoryCorps. Now, most of the people who step into one of those StoryCorps booths have never interviewed anyone before. StoryCorps provides suggested questions to help them along, but as every great interviewer knows, the best moments are often the ones you don't plan for. That is what Anna Freeman discovered when she sat down with her 8-year-old daughter, Brianna.

ANNA FREEMAN: If you could ask me anything in the world, what would it be?

BRIANNA FREEMAN: Do you like unicorns?

FREEMAN: I do. Do you think Unicorns are real?

BRIANNA: Well, they're not technically real, but they're real in my mind.

FREEMAN: Can I ask you a question?

BRIANNA: Yes.

FREEMAN: What is your obsession with unicorns?

BRIANNA: They're cute. And they have horns, so they could attack their bullies.

FREEMAN: Bullies, that's something you've been experiencing lately.

BRIANNA: Yes, at school, people saying that they hate me and putting their hands on me. It's a tough experience.

FREEMAN: The girl that's been bullying you, how does she make you feel?

BRIANNA: She makes me feel like I'm a ghost. I get mad. I get sad. I'm not the person that I was.

FREEMAN: What do you mean by that?

BRIANNA: After she bullied me, I didn't have a smile on my face.

FREEMAN: Why do you think she's saying these mean things?

BRIANNA: Because maybe she wants attention but maybe she doesn't get it at home. If you were in this situation, how would you feel?

FREEMAN: I would feel exactly like you.

BRIANNA: Because we're pretty much twins?

FREEMAN: Yeah, pretty much.

BRIANNA: Have you ever experienced a bully?

FREEMAN: When mommy was in when high school, freshman year, I was bullied.

BRIANNA: Did they ever hurt you?

FREEMAN: I was trying to be brave and tell everybody in the world that, no, it didn't bother me, but deep down inside, it did. It made me feel like I was nothing.

BRIANNA: Well, you're something to me.

FREEMAN: And you're something to me.

BRIANNA: I love you more than a unicorn, and I really love unicorns.

FREEMAN: (Laughter).

BRIANNA: I'm not laughing over here, so. I feel like you're the best mom in the world and that makes me happy.

(SOUNDBITE OF FREDRIK'S "ALINA'S PLACE")

GREENE: Brianna Freeman with her mom, Anna, in Chicago. That conversation will be archived in the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress with the rest of the StoryCorps collection.

(SOUNDBITE OF FREDRIK'S "ALINA'S PLACE")

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