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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Roy, we're all familiar with ride-sharing apps that help us track and predict when to expect our rides. But now there's an app that helps us track and predict our what?

ROY BLOUNT JR.: Is it sort of like ride sharing?

SAGAL: Not in any way.

BLOUNT JR.: Wow.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But it is a way, you know - the whole idea is it's allows you to predict the arrival of something, how big it's going to be, when it will arrive, et cetera, et cetera.

ADAM FELBER: Does this have to do with Alexa and a toilet?

HELEN HONG: Yeah. That's what I was thinking.

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT JR.: God, I hate to say fart on the radio. But I...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah, it's your farts. Indeed.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BLOUNT JR.: I promised my mother I would never do it. And now...

HONG: I actually enjoyed hearing you say fart on the radio.

(LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT JR.: Did you really? Fart.

FELBER: What a week we're having.

SAGAL: Your fart is arriving in four minutes, and its name is Ignacio. Oh, no. It's rated 5 stars.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: A team of Australian researchers have developed a tool to help track the passage of air through your digestive system. You swallow an electronic tablet - little pill. Not like an iPad. That would be hard.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But a little pill - a tablet.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: All right. You've lost me already, but keep going.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right. And this little pill...

BLOUNT JR.: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...Little pill communicates various internal chemical levels and pressures through your phone app.

HONG: What?

SAGAL: And the app is actually able to detect the exact moment of air from your stomach passing into your colon.

HONG: Wait. So this little digital bug thing is like riding an air bubble inside you all the way out.

SAGAL: Yeah, pretty much.

BLOUNT JR.: It's surfing.

SAGAL: And so you're like, come on. We've got to get in the elevator. Not yet.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: OK, now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M COMING OUT")

DIANA ROSS: (Singing) I'm coming out. I'm coming. I'm coming out. I want the world...

SAGAL: Coming up, our panel offers deep discounts on the truth. It's the Bluff the Listener game. Call 1 888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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