The Widespread Flu Epidemic Has Finally Peaked And Is Slowing Down, Says The CDC : Shots - Health News The flu epidemic has peaked, the CDC said Friday. Activity declined last week, but the disease is still widespread and dangerous. And it's still not too late to get a flu shot.
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For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This year's nasty flu season has finally peaked. That's according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even so, NPR's Richard Harris says the disease is still widespread and will be around for weeks to come.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: For the second week in a row, reports of flu-related illness have declined nationwide.

ALICIA FRY: Flu season has peaked, and activity has started to decrease.

HARRIS: But Dr. Alicia Fry at the CDC's influenza division cautions that flu remains present throughout the nation and is widespread in 45 states. And people continue to die from the disease. The CDC tracks pediatric deaths carefully, and that tally has jumped another 17 to 114 in total for the season. Flu reports from hospitals are on the decline, but flu and flu-like illnesses are still responsible for about 5 percent of all hospital visits. The benchmark for that figure in the absence of a flu outbreak is 2.2 percent.

FRY: This season was one of our more severe flu seasons. And the activity got so high that even though now we're decreasing, we're still higher than we were some earlier seasons.

HARRIS: One reason this year was especially harsh is that people are more susceptible to serious illness from the main strain of the flu that circulated this year. To make matters worse, the vaccine to protect people from that strain wasn't very effective. So the flu was still making people sick and still spreading even among people who were vaccinated. The good news is that, in recent weeks, a different strain of the flu has started to dominate, and the vaccine is much more effective in preventing that from causing disease.

FRY: We do recommend that people continue to get vaccinated if they haven't as long as there is flu circulating.

HARRIS: And Fry says flu could be circulating for some time to come.

FRY: We could have six more weeks of flu. Now it could be shorter. We don't know. It's really hard to predict flu, but it could be, you know, a month and a half. We just don't know for sure.

HARRIS: And just because this flu season has peaked doesn't mean it's over. Richard Harris, NPR News.

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