Mary J.K. Blige Every answer in this game is the name of a famous person with initials in their name. We replaced those initials with an initialism beginning with the same letters.
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Mary J.K. Blige

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Mary J.K. Blige

Mary J.K. Blige

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Want our next special guest to play for you? Follow ASK ME ANOTHER on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Our next game is about initialisms, which are like acronyms but less fun. Let's meet our contestants. First up, Danielle Mebert on buzzer No. 1.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're an administrator at NYU. Welcome.

DANIELLE MEBERT: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Katie Edwards on buzzer No. 2.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: You're a mathematician at Bell Labs. Welcome.

KATIE EDWARDS: Thanks for having me.

EISENBERG: Remember, Danielle and Katie, the first of you who wins two of our games will go on to the final round. Let's go to your first game. Danielle, what text abbreviation do you use the most?

MEBERT: In another life, I was an English teacher, so I don't like using abbreviations. So you'll probably see - more likely to be seeing a semicolon from me thrown into a text.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Nice.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Katie, what text abbreviation do you use the most?

EDWARDS: You know, I don't abbreviate much either, but I do use that emoji that's rolling its eyes a lot.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So we've got a word game for you called Mary JK Blige. Every answer is a famous person who uses initials in their name, but we've replaced the initials with an initialism starting with the same letters. For an example, let's go to our puzzle guru, Art Chung.

ART CHUNG: If we said, this architect is famous for designing the Louvre Pyramid and the website that lets you learn the full cast and crew of the "Hannah Montana" movie, you'd answer, IMDB Pei. Replacing I. M. in the architect I. M. Pei with IMDB.

EISENBERG: Ring in to answer. Here we go. This woman suffrage leader once appeared on the dollar coin and famously advocated for two great causes, the 19th Amendment and the concept of taking your own booze to a party.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Danielle.

MEBERT: Susan B-Y-O-B Anthony.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Suffragettes know how to party, too.

JONATHAN COULTON: This African-American author and educator founded Tuskegee University. He was also easily bored reading long chunks of text online and skipped right to the summaries.

CHUNG: Some hints about the person. In 1901, he was the first African-American to be invited to the White House by President Teddy Roosevelt.

EISENBERG: OK.

COULTON: Yeah. All right. What we were looking for is the person was Booker T-L-D-R Washington. And T-L-D-R means too long, didn't read.

EDWARDS: Fair enough.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: This is a hard game. This is a hard game.

EDWARDS: It is a hard game. The author of "Winnie-the-Pooh" couldn't wait to turn 50 so he could qualify for that 10 percent discount at Outback Steakhouse.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Katie.

EDWARDS: A-A-R-P Milne.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Eeyore would be a great spokesman for AARP.

COULTON: He would. This actress always checks her tire pressure before she rides her bike to the set of "Empire," where she plays Cookie Lyon.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Danielle.

MEBERT: The actress is Taraji P. Henson, and I'm guessing T-P-M for tire pressure monitoring.

EISENBERG: Good guess. That initialism doesn't start with the right letter. Katie, can you steal?

EDWARDS: It's T-P-S-I, and I don't remember the last name you just said.

(LAUGHTER)

EDWARDS: Henderson?

COULTON: You would have to work - you know, you each get a half a point, so that's fine. Taraji P-S-I Henson is what we were looking for.

EISENBERG: P-S-I being pounds per square inch.

COULTON: That's right. This is your last clue. This "Snakes On A Plane" star formed a corporation to protect his personal assets in the event that someone tried to sue him over a viper attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Danielle.

MEBERT: Samuel LLC Jackson.

COULTON: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Art Chung, how did our contestants do?

CHUNG: Another tough game. Congratulations, Danielle. You're one step closer to our final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Why not be a contestant on our show? Go to amatickets.org and sign up to take our quiz. Coming up, our house musician will play music about houses, but it is not house music. What do you think we, are DJ Tiesto? I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

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