It's Aliiiiiive! And This Year, Our Summer Reader Poll Is All About Horror Our famous Summer Reader Poll lurches to life, dripping grave-dirt and bits of glowing green, ready to hear all about your favorite horror novels and stories. What sends a shiver down your spine?
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It's Aliiiiiive! This Year, Our Summer Reader Poll Is All About Horror

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It's Aliiiiiive! This Year, Our Summer Reader Poll Is All About Horror

It's Aliiiiiive! This Year, Our Summer Reader Poll Is All About Horror

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617208292/620471178" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Now for some more adult reading. Every year, NPR conducts an annual summer reader poll. This is your chance to tell us what you are loving reading. And this year's theme is horror. Petra Mayer from the NPR Books team is here to tell us more. Hey there, Petra.

PETRA MAYER, BYLINE: Hi.

KELLY: So horror - why?

MAYER: Yeah. It's the 200th anniversary of Frankenstein, which is...

KELLY: Oh, OK. So - yeah.

MAYER: ...You know, one of the most influential horror novels of all time. So we thought it would be a great theme. And we're asking people to tell us all about their five favorite horror novels and short stories. And I hope you appreciate how hard this is for me. I am a giant horror wuss.

KELLY: (Laughter).

MAYER: I was scarred for life by a copy of "Cujo" that I found as a kid. No joke - for 15 years after that, I was scared every time a dog licked me.

KELLY: Have you sent Stephen King the bill for your therapy yet?

MAYER: Oh, that's a good idea.

KELLY: (Laughter) OK, but now you must - you're at least enduring reading some horror books.

MAYER: I have learned to appreciate it. I mean, in a weird way, horror can almost be comforting, right? It drags up all the things that scare you. It's right there on the page. Horror doesn't sugarcoat. It tells you that death and fear are part of life, and you got to deal with them. And it's also - you know, when you feel like everything's wrong, a horror novel will tell you you're right. There is something terrible going on. There's a reason you feel this way. And you can identify it, and you can fight it. Whether you win - that's another story.

KELLY: You have a place to channel your dread. OK, so you want us all to write. And I will tell everybody where in a second. And then what happens?

MAYER: So I say this every year. This is not a straight popularity contest. After the poll closes, which is Monday at 5 p.m. Eastern, we'll pick the top 250 vote-getters. And they go to this amazing panel of expert judges. They're all amazing horror authors. And then we have this epic conference call when we break the list down and we build it back up again. And we come up with a nicely curated list of a hundred final titles. And we hope that'll keep you busy for a while.

KELLY: And some votes have already come in. Any front-runners yet?

MAYER: Not yet, but I'm sure that Stephen King will be all over the list. And since there's only a hundred books to play with, usually we don't like to have authors on the list more than once. But a couple years ago with the romance poll, we had to invent the Nora Roberts rule 'cause she's so famous and prolific. We had to let...

KELLY: Oh, she got to come in a couple times.

MAYER: Yeah, once as herself and once under her pen name. So I foresee a Stephen King corollary coming to us.

KELLY: All right. That's Petra Mayer, editor with NPR Books. And you can find the summer reader poll - here it is - npr.org/summerscares. Thanks so much, Petra.

MAYER: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF MICHAEL CROWTHER'S "DARK ENTITY")

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