Whale Watching Thar she blows! At the Nantucket Film Festival, movies and whale-watching combine. In this audio quiz, contestants identify clips from movies featuring whales.
NPR logo

Listen.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624394649/624654271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Whale Watching

Listen.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624394649/624654271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Next we'll play a game about whales in movies. Let's check in with our contestants. Dean, this is your second film festival. Is that right?

DEAN CHOU: Yeah, my second major film festival, yeah.

EISENBERG: Your first one was...

CHOU: I actually was in Cannes, France, for the Cannes Film Festival a couple weeks ago.

EISENBERG: I've never heard of it. Is it fun?

(LAUGHTER)

CHOU: Yeah, it's interesting. You know, it's a small town...

EISENBERG: Small town.

CHOU: ...In France.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

CHOU: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Yeah. A couple indie films usually go there.

CHOU: Yeah, yeah, only the smallest ones, yeah.

EISENBERG: I like that.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So, Peter, you love puzzles. You run game nights all the time. And you have created a pretty involved Easter egg hunt. Can you tell us about it?

PETER DIMAURO: Yes. It was about 10 years ago. Me and my close friend wanted to get in the Easter spirit, as one does. And we were like, why don't we have an Easter egg hunt? But we didn't want to just leave it at that because that would be too simple. So instead, we just got a bunch of plastic eggs, assigned a color to every person we were going to invite and then put a different puzzle in every egg. So once you found all your eggs, you then had to solve all the puzzles in each egg. Every puzzle led to a word that you then had to put in the correct order for a sentence, and then that was the winner.

EISENBERG: That's pretty great.

DIMAURO: It was a lot of fun.

EISENBERG: Let's go to your next game. We're at the Nantucket Film Festival where you can watch whales and watch movies, so you have an audio quiz that is all about movies with whales in them. I'll play you a clip. You identify the movie. Peter, you won the last game, so if you win this, you're in the final round. Dean, you need to win this, or you have to change your name to Queequeg.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Here's your first clip.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FREE WILLY")

JASON JAMES RICHTER: (As Jesse) I know you can jump this wall. Come on, I believe in you. You can do it. You can be free. Come on, you can jump it.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Peter.

DIMAURO: "Free Willy."

EISENBERG: That is correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: And here you go, fun fact - killer whales or orcas are actually dolphins. That's right, my friends, they are the largest member of the dolphin family. Their name comes from the Spanish for whale killer, but it eventually got flipped to killer whale, thus the confusion. Think about that for the rest of your stay.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Here's an animated fish doing a whale impression.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FINDING NEMO")

ELLEN DEGENERES: (As Dory) We need...

ALBERT BROOKS: (As Marlin) Dory.

DEGENERES: (As Dory) ...To find...

BROOKS: (As Marlin) What are you doing?

DEGENERES: (As Dory) ...His son.

BROOKS: (As Marlin) What are you doing?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Dean.

CHOU: Is that "Finding Nemo"?

EISENBERG: Sure is, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: A demigod voiced by The Rock briefly turns into a whale to fight a lava monster in this Disney movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "MOANA")

DWAYNE JOHNSON: (As Maui) I got your back, chosen one. Go save the world.

AULI'I CRAVALHO: (As Moana) Maui, thank you.

JOHNSON: (As Maui) You're welcome. Cheeeehooo (ph).

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Peter.

DIMAURO: "Moana."

EISENBERG: "Moana" is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I haven't seen it. Is that bad?

DIMAURO: It's really good.

EISENBERG: I've heard it's really good.

DIMAURO: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Have you seen it, Dean?

CHOU: No, I haven't.

EISENBERG: All right, we can go.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: We can be the only two people left. All right, this Ron Howard film is based on a true story that was the inspiration for "Moby Dick."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "IN THE HEART OF THE SEA")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character) Mr. Chase, you have the best position.

CHRIS HEMSWORTH: (As Owen Chase) It's just a whale.

EISENBERG: No one's ringing in. I feel like they might need a hint, right?

CECIL BALDWIN: This movie stars Chris Hemsworth.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: No.

BALDWIN: And it is not wet Thor.

EISENBERG: It's not called wet Thor.

BALDWIN: No. But it could be.

EISENBERG: That would be a great name for something.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right, anyone out there know?

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: "In The Heart Of The Sea."

EISENBERG: "In The Heart Of The Sea" starring Chris Hemsworth. That is a true story based off of the features of Nantucket natives whose boat was smashed by a sperm whale...

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: ...Ended up on a horrifying journey at sea and eventually cannibalized each other for survival. OK, great game. You guys were fabulous. Peter, you won both games, so you are off to the final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Thank you so much, Dean - great competitor. Coming up, we'll meet a policeman who had the safest beat in the universe - Mr. Rogers' neighborhood. The worst thing that happened there was Daniel Tiger's clock needed to be adjusted or maybe X the Owl pooped on the trolley. So grab your cardigan and stay tuned. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(CHEERING)

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.