GOP Pressures Bush on Border Bill Ceremony President Bush is scheduled Thursday to sign legislation authorizing the construction of a fence along the U.S.-Mexico border to help curb the flow of illegal immigrants. The signing was originally planned without a ceremony, but congressional Republicans demanded a public signing.
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GOP Pressures Bush on Border Bill Ceremony

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GOP Pressures Bush on Border Bill Ceremony

GOP Pressures Bush on Border Bill Ceremony

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ALEX CHADWICK, host:

And now back to David Greene at the White House because there's another big story coming there. David tomorrow the President is set to sign into law a bill to build the seven hundred miles of fencing along the U.S./Mexico border. This is what came out of congress with the big immigration debate this year. The White House didn't want to make this a public ceremony but now it will.

DAVID GREENE: They didn't. They were actually considering not having a public signing ceremony. This is not a bill the White House is really excited about Alex. The President had always said that any immigration reform needed to be in his word, comprehensive, which included a guest worker plan to give illegal immigrants in the country a crack at legal working status, but also some, some new changes beefing up the border. A lot of conservatives in the house didn't really want to go into the guest worker plan before the election. They just decided to take measures like building a fence, and so the President not getting all he wanted. But they are going to have a public signing ceremony but very low key in the Roosevelt Room without a large gathering. So they're trying to find a balance here.

CHADWICK: Who's leading, the White House or the congressional Republicans?

GREENE: Well we'll have to wait and see until after the election. If the President returns, gets a guest worker plan and really fights for it, I think he'll ultimately say that he led in inside a political reality. But if he never gets what he wants then I think it will appear that congressional Republicans had their way.

CHADWICK: NPR's David Greene at the White House. Thanks David.

GREENE: A pleasure Alex.

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