Voices in the News A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: unknown sports announcer for the World Series; Jeanne Wade Evans, supervisor of the San Bernardino National Forest; unknown firefighter; Vice President Dick Cheney; White House Press Secretary Tony Snow; President George W. Bush; General George Casey; Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki; Howard Dean; Karl Rove.
NPR logo

Voices in the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6400811/6400812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Voices in the News

Voices in the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6400811/6400812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen, and these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Unidentified Man #1 (Sportscaster): It's been 24 years since the St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series. Now, they're one strike away from doing it again. Wainwright in the stretch, pitches...

(Soundbite of cheering)

Ms. JEANNE WADE EVANS (Supervisor, San Bernardino National Forest): Right now, all the employees on the San Jacinto Ranger District are standing down on the fire. We will always be looking for firefighter safety as our first priority, no matter what incident we're in.

Unidentified Man #2 (Firefighter): In the fire service, we all have to do a job. And we have to complete the job that we're doing now. And then we'll grieve as we get time. As for right now, we still have to do other things.

Mr. SCOTT HENNEN (Talk Show Host): Would you agree a dunk in water is a no-brainer if it can save lives?

Vice President DICK CHENEY: Well, it's a no-brainer for me. But I - for a while there I was criticized as being the vice president for torture. We don't torture. That's not what we're involved in. We live up to our obligations and international treaties that we're party to and so forth.

Mr. TONY SNOW (White House Press Secretary): No-brainer number one is we don't torture. No-brainer number two, we don't break the law, our own or international law. No-brainer number three, the vice president doesn't give away questioning techniques.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: I know many Americans are not satisfied with the situation in Iraq. I'm not satisfied either, and that is why we're taking new steps to help secure Baghdad, and constantly adjusting our tactics across the country to meet the changing threat.

General GEORGE CASEY (U.S. Army): It's going to take another 12 or 18 months or so till I believe the Iraqi Security Forces are completely capable of taking over responsibility for their own security; still probably with some level of support from us that that will be asked for by the Iraqis.

Prime Minister NOURI AL-MALIKI (Iraq): (Through translator) Others have the right to direct their politics in their own way, but this is a government of the people, and no one has the right to impose a timetable on it.

Mr. HOWARD DEAN (Chairman, Democratic National Committee): The point of the next two years and the point of electing Democrats in two weeks, is to change the direction, to restore our strength at home and abroad, to restore our respect, and frankly to restore the moral position that the United States has occupied in the world since the end of World War One.

Mr. KARL ROVE (White House Advisor): I'm looking at all of these and adding them up, and I add up to a Republican Senate and a Republican House. You may end up with a different math, but you're entitled to your math and I'm entitled to The Math.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.