Sunday Puzzle: Third Rhyme's The Charm NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and puzzlemaster Will Shortz play the puzzle this week with Nicole Castonguay of Portland, Ore.
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Sunday Puzzle: Third Rhyme's The Charm

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Sunday Puzzle: Third Rhyme's The Charm

Sunday Puzzle: Third Rhyme's The Charm

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining me as always is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu. Welcome back.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Thanks. I heard you've been traveling by limo recently (laughter).

SHORTZ: Yeah, well...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Explain.

SHORTZ: ...I was just in Toronto for a bit part in a film. And very kindly, they had limo service for me. And I hope I don't get spoiled by this.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I've got to say there's a lot of stories now about like, documentaries and flying off to Hollywood, and now you're in a movie. I don't know. I don't know. You're going to get...

SHORTZ: (Laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Too big for us soon, I think.

SHORTZ: Never.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Never. All right. Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Eric Chaikin of Los Angeles. I said the name of the film director David Lynch conceals the word avidly in consecutive letters spanning his first and last names. Can you think of a famous film director whose first and last names conceal a six-letter name of a car, past or present, in consecutive letters? Well, my intended answer was Guillermo del Toro, which very neatly conceals Model T. Of course, he was the director of "The Shape Of Water" and a lot of other things. Amazingly, there was an alternative answer, Dennis Sanders. Also his name works because it has Nissan.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. We had just over 600 correct responses. And this week's winner is Nicole Castonguay of Portland, Ore. Congratulations, Nicole.

NICOLE CASTONGUAY: Thanks.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So you've been playing The Puzzle for a while?

CASTONGUAY: I've probably been playing regularly for about a year.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's good. Somebody new. OK, Nicole. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

CASTONGUAY: I am.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Nicole. I'm going to give you two words that rhyme. Each word has one syllable. You tell me another one-syllable word that rhymes with my two words and that fits between my two words alphabetically. For example, if I said West, W-E-S-T and zest, Z-E-S-T, you would say wrest, W-R-E-S-T, because it rhymes with my two words. And it's the only one that fits between those two words alphabetically. Is that clear?

CASTONGUAY: All right. Yep.

SHORTZ: All right. It's actually harder than it sounds, but let's try this. Number one is own, O-W-N, and pone, P-O-N-E.

CASTONGUAY: OK, so must either start with an O or a P.

SHORTZ: Right.

CASTONGUAY: Prone would not - no.

SHORTZ: Prone is just a little too late, yeah...

CASTONGUAY: Right.

SHORTZ: ...Alphabetically. And here's a hint. What are you on right now? How are you doing The Puzzle?

CASTONGUAY: Oh, phone.

SHORTZ: You're on a phone, right. P-H-O-N-E - good. Number two is jack, J-A-C-K, and lack, L-A-C-K.

CASTONGUAY: So is kack (ph) considered a word?

SHORTZ: No, has to be a common word. It does start with...

CASTONGUAY: (Unintelligible).

SHORTZ: ...K, though.

CASTONGUAY: All right.

SHORTZ: It starts with a silent K.

CASTONGUAY: Knack.

SHORTZ: Knack is it - good. Now you're catching on. Your next one is rule, R-U-L-E, and spool, S-P-O-O-L.

CASTONGUAY: Well, school.

SHORTZ: School. Good job. Hare, H-A-R-E, and lair, L-A-I-R.

CASTONGUAY: Uh, H, I, J, K.

SHORTZ: And here's your little hint - it starts with a silent letter.

CASTONGUAY: Would that be a K again?

SHORTZ: Not a K, no. Nope. I don't want to repeat that trick. It's a different letter.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It's got to do with the offspring of royalty.

CASTONGUAY: Heir.

SHORTZ: Heir, H-E-I-R, good. Here's your next one - gash, G-A-S-H, and hash, H-A-S-H.

CASTONGUAY: How about gnash?

SHORTZ: Gnash, good. Reach, R-E-A-C-H, and speech, S-P-E-E-C-H.

CASTONGUAY: So it could be, like, a S-L or a S-N.

SHORTZ: It does start with S. You're right.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Birds sometimes do this.

CASTONGUAY: Screech.

SHORTZ: Screech, good. And your last one - char, C-H-A-R, and far, F-A-R.

CASTONGUAY: It could have a D or an E or a C.

SHORTZ: And here's your hint - it starts with a silent C.

CASTONGUAY: Czar?

SHORTZ: Czar is it. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job, Nicole. Coming home strong. How's it feel?

CASTONGUAY: It's tough being put on the spot like that.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So it is. For playing our puzzle today, though, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Nicole, what member station do you listen to?

CASTONGUAY: I listen to KOPB.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Nicole Castonguay, thank you for playing The Puzzle.

CASTONGUAY: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Bruce Campbell (ph) of Kansas City, Mo. Think of two well-known companies - one in five letters, the other in four. Write the names one after the other. And the result, when spaced differently, will name a well-known geographical location in the U.S. in two words. What is it? So again, two well-known companies - five letters and four letters. Write them one after the other. And the result, when spaced differently, will name a well-known geographical location in the U.S. in two words. What location is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, when he's not in the movies - our very own Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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