Arch Nemesis In celebration of St. Louis's famous Gateway Arch, each answer has the consecutive letters A-R-C-H.
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Arch Nemesis

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Arch Nemesis

Arch Nemesis

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

It's time to crown our big winner. Let's bring back our finalists - Claire Hubert, who got into French for the friendship, and Sheila Oliveri, who represented Missouri in the National Chicken Cooking Contest.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Claire, Sheila, your final round is called Arch Nemesis. St. Louis' most famous landmark is of course the Gateway Arch. Every answer in this final round contains the consecutive letters A-R-C-H, although they may or may not be pronounced arch. For example, if I said, this fermented milk product is named after an English village in Somerset, you'd answer cheddar cheese. The consecutive letters A-R-C-H appear at the end of cheddar and at the beginning of cheese.

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE: Oh.

EISENBERG: Yeah, let it sink in.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Our big winner will receive an ASK ME ANOTHER the Rubik's Cube signed by Matt and Kim that is also covered in melted Provel cheese.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: We rolled a 20-sided die backstage, and Sheila is going first. Here we go. Sheila, Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright and Mike Brady all share this profession.

SHEILA OLIVERI: Architect.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire, Louis Leakey, Gertrude Bell and Indiana Jones all share this field of study.

CLAIRE HUBERT: Archaeology.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sheila, it's the building in Washington, D.C., where Nicholas Cage went to steal the Declaration of Independence.

OLIVERI: The National Archives.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire, Argo is a popular brand of this white, powdery food product commonly used to thicken sauces.

HUBERT: Cornstarch.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Sheila, according to a recent piece in The New York Times, this butterfly, distinguished by its orange and black colors, recently experienced a large population decline.

OLIVERI: Monarch.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire, this term describes a scattered group of islands in the same body of water.

HUBERT: An archipegalo (ph). I didn't say that right at all.

EISENBERG: Yeah, we're going to go with it - archipelago.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

HUBERT: That one.

JONATHAN COULTON: That one, says Claire.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Yeah, that's what I meant.

EISENBERG: Sheila, H. Jon Benjamin, who voices Bob in "Bob's Burgers," also voices the title character in this animated TV show - three seconds.

OLIVERI: Archie.

EISENBERG: I'm sorry, that is incorrect. We were looking for "Archer." Claire, he's the protagonist of TV's "Riverdale."

HUBERT: Archie.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(LAUGHTER, SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: We're at the halfway point. Claire is in the lead 4-3. Sheila, Alia Shawkat stars in this TBS comedy about friends who are looking for someone - three seconds.

OLIVERI: Wow.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUZZER)

EISENBERG: "Search Party" is the name of the show.

OLIVERI: Oh, well, that makes sense.

EISENBERG: Yeah, sure.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Claire, the company iHeartMedia, which owns and operates more than 850 radio stations in the United States, was previously known by this name - three seconds.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUZZER)

EISENBERG: Clear Channel.

OLIVERI: Oh.

UNIDENTIFIED AUDIENCE: Oh.

EISENBERG: Sheila, according to legend, the exclamation eureka was shouted by this ancient Greek mathematician.

OLIVERI: Archimedes.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire, in "The Hunger Games" films, Philip Seymour Hoffman played a character named after this ancient Greek author who wrote "Parallel Lives" and "Moralia."

HUBERT: Plutarch.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: OK, here's the situation. Claire is in the lead. We each have one question left. Sheila, you need to get this question right to stay in the game. Sheila, dating back to ancient times, this paper-like writing material was made from animal skin.

OLIVERI: Parchment.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Claire, if you get this right, you win. Merriam-Webster defines this as absence of government.

HUBERT: Anarchy.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Great game. Sheila, you are a gem.

OLIVERI: Thank you.

EISENBERG: And congratulations, Claire, you're our big winner.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That's our show. ASK ME ANOTHER's house musician is Jonathan Coulton.

COULTON: Hey, my name anagrams to thou jolt a cannon.

EISENBERG: Our puzzles were written by Carol Lee and senior writers Eric Feinstein, Karen Lurie (ph) and J. Keith van Straaten with additional material by Shantira Jackson and Emily Winter. Our senior supervising producer is Rachel Neel. ASK ME ANOTHER is produced by Sylvie Douglis, Mike Katzif, Travis Larchuk, Kiarra Powell, Denny Shin...

COULTON: Shed Ninny.

EISENBERG: ...And Rommel Wood along with Steve Nelson and Anya Grundmann. We are recorded by Damon Whittemore. We'd like to thank The Pageant...

COULTON: The neat gap.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: ...KWMU St. Louis Public Radio...

COULTON: Diabolic sour tulips.

EISENBERG: ...And our production partner WNYC. I'm her ripe begonias.

COULTON: Ophira Eisenberg.

EISENBERG: And this was the ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(APPLAUSE)

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