Sunday Puzzle: Make Me A Star NPR's Renee Montagne and puzzlemaster Will Shortz play this week's puzzle with Bill Makosey of East Lansing, Mich.
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Sunday Puzzle: Make Me A Star

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Sunday Puzzle: Make Me A Star

Sunday Puzzle: Make Me A Star

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We'll take you back to Las Vegas in a moment and eat some chocolates. But for now, place your bets, please, ladies and gentlemen, your bets. It's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Joining us as always is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Good morning.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: OK. Will, go ahead and remind us first of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It turned out to be a tough one. I said, write down these five two-word phrases - property rights, land mine, sales order, color scheme and India ink. And I said, they have something very unusual in common. What is it? And when you find it, think of another two-word phrase that has the same property. Well, the first three letters of the first words start the name of a state capital. So property is Providence. Land is Lansing. Sales is Salem. Color is Columbia. And India is Indianapolis. And the first two letters of the second word are that capital's state postal abbreviation.

MONTAGNE: And by the way, it was so tough that we had fewer than 100 correct responses this week. The winner is Bill Makosey of East Lansing, Mich. Congratulations, and welcome to the program.

BILL MAKOSEY: Oh, thank you.

MONTAGNE: And now, I hear you used to work on Sunday mornings, just as we are doing.

MAKOSEY: Yeah. I had a job where I had to go in a couple of hours every Sunday. And while I was there, I would turn on the radio. And that's where I started listening to The Puzzle.

MONTAGNE: Is there anything you'd like to ask Will before we get started?

MAKOSEY: I wanted to just tell him when they called me to tell me that I would be playing The Puzzle, they interrupted me because I was doing a crossword puzzle.

SHORTZ: (Laughter) I like that.

MONTAGNE: OK. Well, Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right. Bill and Renee, I'm going to give you two four-letter words. The first word can be found in consecutive letters inside the first name of a famous person, past or present.

MAKOSEY: OK.

SHORTZ: The second word can be found in consecutive letters inside that person's last name.

MAKOSEY: All right.

SHORTZ: For example, if I said pole, P-O-L-E, and part, P-A-R-T, you would say Napoleon Bonaparte because pole is inside Napoleon, and part is inside Bonaparte.

MAKOSEY: OK.

SHORTZ: All right. Number one is will, W-I-L-L, and pear, P-E-A-R.

MAKOSEY: William Shakespeare.

SHORTZ: Oh, that was good. Here's your next one - avid, A-V-I-D, and term, T-E-R-M.

MAKOSEY: David.

SHORTZ: Yes, and think of television host.

MAKOSEY: Oh, David Letterman.

SHORTZ: Letterman is right. Live, L-I-V-E, and hard, H-A-R-D.

MAKOSEY: Oliver Hardy.

SHORTZ: That's fast. Wins, W-I-N-S, and hill, H-I-L-L.

MAKOSEY: Winston.

SHORTZ: Who's a famous Winston?

MAKOSEY: Oh, Churchill.

SHORTZ: Winston Churchill is it. Else, E-L-S-E, and lint, L-I-N-T.

MONTAGNE: Wow. That's a tricky one.

SHORTZ: It's female.

MAKOSEY: E-L-S-E?

SHORTZ: Right, like what else is new? Yeah.

MAKOSEY: Yeah. OK.

MONTAGNE: Could I ask, are both of these sort of tucked in the middle?

SHORTZ: Yes, they are, and...

MONTAGNE: So...

SHORTZ: Each name has seven letters.

MONTAGNE: Because I look at else, and I think Elsie (ph). But of course, that name has...

SHORTZ: Right.

MONTAGNE: ...Got an I in it.

MAKOSEY: Chelsea.

SHORTZ: Yes.

MAKOSEY: What was the last?

SHORTZ: Lint, L-I-N-T, like what builds up in the dryer.

MAKOSEY: Clinton - Chelsea Clinton.

SHORTZ: Chelsea Clinton. Good. Than, T-H-A-N, and horn, H-O-R-N.

MAKOSEY: Nathan.

SHORTZ: Yeah. It does start N-A, but then there's a few more letters.

MAKOSEY: Nathaniel Hawthorne.

SHORTZ: Nice job. Here's your last one. Rove, R-O-V-E, and elan, E-L-A-N.

MAKOSEY: Grover Cleveland.

SHORTZ: Nice job.

MONTAGNE: Very nice going, and for playing our Puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Bill, what member station do you listen to?

MAKOSEY: I listen to WKAR in East Lansing.

MONTAGNE: OK. Well, thank you for playing The Puzzle.

MAKOSEY: OK. Thank you very much.

MONTAGNE: And, Will, tell us next week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Jim Levering (ph) of San Antonio, Texas. Think of an affliction in five letters. Shift each letter three spaces later in the alphabet. For example, A would become D. B would become E, et cetera. And the result will be a prominent name in the Bible. Who is it? So again, an affliction in five letters. Shift each letter three spaces later in the alphabet. And the result will be a prominent name in the Bible. Who is it?

MONTAGNE: And when you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, September 27 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you will get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Renee.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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