Sunday Puzzle: Cal It Like It is NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Weekend Edition Puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WNYC listener John Price of Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
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Sunday Puzzle: Cal It Like It is

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Sunday Puzzle: Cal It Like It is

Sunday Puzzle: Cal It Like It is

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us as always is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu. And you are in California. I am so jealous.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah, I'm in LA. And it is awesome.

SHORTZ: (Laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said think of a title for a particular person - two words, 15 letters in total - in which the only vowel is I. What is it? Well, the answer is Miss Mississippi. And there's been a famous one, the actress, entertainer Mary Ann Mobley. She was Miss Mississippi in 1958 and became Miss America in 1959 and went on to a great career. And interestingly, British knightship also answers the puzzle, except it has 17 letters rather than 15.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We had 425 responses. And the winner is John Price (ph) of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Congratulations.

JOHN PRICE: Thanks, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You actually won the puzzle back in 2015.

PRICE: Yes, that's right. And I can bet that a lot of people who've been playing since the postcard days are probably really furious at me right now...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

PRICE: ...For having won twice, so sorry about that.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I am pretty sure that that is true. But that, I guess, is the meaning of random. All right, John. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

PRICE: I'm ready. Let's do it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, John. Every answer today is a word or a name that starts with the syllable cal, C-A-L. How appropriate. For example, if I said an important nutritional element in milk and cheese, you would say calcium.

PRICE: OK, got it.

SHORTZ: All right. Number one - Hobbes' friend in the comics.

PRICE: Calvin.

SHORTZ: Right. The largest city in Alberta.

PRICE: Calgary.

SHORTZ: Right. A measuring device.

PRICE: Calculator.

SHORTZ: Interesting.

PRICE: Or...

SHORTZ: Maybe in a way. I was thinking - literally, it's a - well, it's the symbol for...

PRICE: Oh, calipers.

SHORTZ: Calipers is what I'm going for. Ingredient in a soothing lotion.

PRICE: Calamine.

SHORTZ: That's right. One of the largest cities in India in its English spelling.

PRICE: Calcutta.

SHORTZ: Right. Wife of Caesar.

PRICE: I'm sorry? Oh, Calpurnia.

SHORTZ: Calpurnia. I'm impressed.

PRICE: (Laughter) Thanks.

SHORTZ: Classical name for Scotland.

PRICE: Caledonia.

SHORTZ: Nice. A Caribbean stew.

PRICE: Oh, callaloo.

SHORTZ: Callaloo. Yeah.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. You're on fire.

SHORTZ: (Laughter) Kind of cat.

PRICE: Calico.

SHORTZ: Right.

PRICE: I have one.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

SHORTZ: Nice. Thickened bit of skin on the hand of a manual worker.

PRICE: Callus.

SHORTZ: Right. Rudely uncaring.

PRICE: Callous.

SHORTZ: Callous in the different spelling, right?

PRICE: Yeah.

SHORTZ: A Muslim ruler.

PRICE: A caliph.

SHORTZ: Right. In the Bible, where Jesus was crucified.

PRICE: Calvary.

SHORTZ: Calvary's right. And your last one is gym exercises.

PRICE: Calisthenics.

SHORTZ: John, that was impressive.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was impressive. What do you do, John?

PRICE: Thank you so much. I'm actually an analyst in human resources at a consulting firm.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK. I would not have said that because I feel like you're, like, a professor.

SHORTZ: An encyclopedia (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah, like an encyclopedia or a professor.

PRICE: (Laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did so well.

PRICE: I probably learned most from The New York Times crosswords.

(LAUGHTER)

PRICE: Thank you, Will.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get another WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, John, what member station do you listen to?

PRICE: WNYC in New York.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go. Thanks for playing The Puzzle.

PRICE: Thank you both.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. Take the seven-letter last name of a famous woman. Drop the letter E. Add an I and an F - that's F as in Frank - and you can rearrange the result to get a word that famously describes this woman. Who's the woman? And what's the word? So again, famous - the last name of a famous woman, seven letters. Drop the E. Add an I and an F. And you can rearrange the result to get a word that famously describes this woman. Who is she?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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