Sunday Puzzle: Find The Missing Link NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Weekend Edition Puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with WRVO listener Dan Panachyda of Manlius, N.Y.
NPR logo

Sunday Puzzle: Find The Missing Link

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/659245659/659279187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sunday Puzzle: Find The Missing Link

Sunday Puzzle: Find The Missing Link

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/659245659/659279187" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

And it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us as always is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu. You're back from LA.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I'm back from LA. So go ahead and remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the seven-letter last name of a famous woman. Drop the letter E. Add an I and an F, and you can rearrange the result to get a word that famously describes this woman. Who is she? And what's the word? Well, the answer is Steinem as in Gloria Steinem. And she is a feminist. And how cool is it that her name has all those letters?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Very cool. We had 438 responses. And the winner is Dan Panachyda of Manlius, N.Y. Congratulations and welcome to the program.

DAN PANACHYDA: Thank you very much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So you've been playing The Puzzle for quite a while, I understand.

PANACHYDA: I have been - been trying to enter as many times as I can.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Really? Was this a dream? (Laughter).

PANACHYDA: This was. This is wonderful.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I also heard you have a large collection of books, as well.

PANACHYDA: Yes. I collect Sherlock Holmes pastiches and novels and stories about Conan Doyle. I have roughly - I just checked this morning. I have about a thousand now.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. What draws you to Sherlock Holmes?

PANACHYDA: The analytical thinking, the way that he's able to, you know, analyze a problem from very little information.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, I hope you'll be able to analyze the questions to The Puzzle. Are you ready to play?

PANACHYDA: I am ready.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Dan. I'm going to give you two words. Think of a word that can follow my first one and precede my second one in each case to complete a familiar two-word phrase. And the answer will rhyme with one of the two words. For example, if I said snail and order, you would say mail as in snail mail and mail order. And mail rhymes with snail. And the rhyme can be for either the first or the second word. Number one is legal and eye, E-Y-E.

PANACHYDA: Oh, I'm freezing up. Let's see. Can I get a hint?

SHORTZ: This one, the answer here rhymes with legal - legal blank and blank eye.

PANACHYDA: All I can think is beagle, and that's not right.

SHORTZ: Just take off the consonant at the start.

PANACHYDA: Oh, legal eagle.

SHORTZ: Legal eagle and eagle eye is it. OK. You're off and running. Number two is health and bear, B-E-A-R.

PANACHYDA: Health care.

SHORTZ: That's it - health care, Care Bear. Fat, F-A-T, and burglar.

PANACHYDA: Cat burglar.

SHORTZ: That's it. Pipe and team, T-E-A-M.

PANACHYDA: Pipe dream.

SHORTZ: That's it. Boob, B-O-O-B, and steak, S-T-E-A-K.

PANACHYDA: Tube steak.

SHORTZ: That's it. Pork, P-O-R-K, and shop, S-H-O-P.

PANACHYDA: Pork chop.

SHORTZ: Daily, trouble.

PANACHYDA: Daily double.

SHORTZ: Blame, B-L-A-M-E, and plan, P-L-A-N.

PANACHYDA: Blame, plan. Name, game, (unintelligible) - game plan.

SHORTZ: Game plan is it. Stun, S-T-U-N, and barrel, B-A-R-R-E-L.

PANACHYDA: Gun barrel.

SHORTZ: Yes. Snow, S-N-O-W, and knight, K-N-I-G-H-T.

PANACHYDA: Snow fight, Snow light.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: A controversial Disney film. I'm kidding, not so controversial (laughter).

PANACHYDA: Oh, "Snow White."

SHORTZ: "Snow White" and white knight is right. Piping and pot, P-O-T.

PANACHYDA: Piping hot.

SHORTZ: That's it. Crawl, race, R-A-C-E.

PANACHYDA: Crawl space.

SHORTZ: That's it. And here's your last one. Funny, F-U-N-N-Y, and order.

PANACHYDA: Funny, order.

SHORTZ: You got the right rhyme.

PANACHYDA: Money order.

SHORTZ: Money order is it. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. How do you feel?

PANACHYDA: Relieved.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We get that a lot. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. Dan, what member station do you listen to?

PANACHYDA: WRVO in Syracuse, N.Y.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go. Thank you for playing The Puzzle.

PANACHYDA: Thank you very much.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah. Take the nine letters of beer mouth - B-E-E-R M-O-U-T-H - and arrange them in a three by three array so that the three lines across, three lines down and both diagonals spell common three-letter words. Can you do it? So again, the nine letters of beer mouth, arrange them in a three by three array so that the three lines across, three lines down and both diagonals spell common three-letter words. Can you do it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember. Just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.