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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Faith, a private spaceflight company is looking for volunteers willing to go into outer space specifically to do what?

FAITH SALIE: Oh, my goodness. Well, is it something that you can only do in outer space?

SAGAL: No.

SALIE: OK, it's...

SAGAL: It's frequently done here. You've done it. But it's never been done in space before.

SALIE: Have babies in...

SAGAL: Yes...

SALIE: ...Space?

SAGAL: ...To give birth...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: ...In space.

HELEN HONG: What?

SALIE: Wow.

SAGAL: If you've always wanted to get pregnant without gaining any weight...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...A company called SpaceLife Origins (ph) has the gig for you. They say that if we ever want to travel to distant worlds, we're going to need to learn to reproduce in space, so they're looking for a volunteer to test it.

HONG: What?

SAGAL: The idea is you'll first go up into space, conceive the baby, come back down, gestate, wait nine months, fly back up...

HONG: Don't you need - like, I've never given birth, but don't you need, like, gravity?

(LAUGHTER)

ADAM BURKE: Yeah.

HONG: Right?

BURKE: It'd help, right?

HONG: Isn't there - like, isn't gravity...

SALIE: Yeah.

HONG: ...Helpful...

BURKE: Yeah.

HONG: ...For birthing a baby?

BURKE: I mean, you're not going to - you might want to hold onto that umbilical.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's not going anywhere. Don't worry. We'll just pull it right back in. Yeah. Although, I mean, you're all - we're all focusing on the giving birth part, which will be weird enough. But the first part...

HONG: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...The conception - that's never been done in space. And...

HONG: So we think.

SAGAL: ...The pressure - who knows what will happen? It's, like, Houston, we have a problem. This has never happened before.

BURKE: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: I mean, are you ovulating, or are we just right next to the moon?

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Also, as someone who has given birth, breastfeeding in space is kind of - that's a cool idea.

BURKE: Yeah.

SALIE: You could be, like, a - your kid could be across the room, and you could be, like, stay right there.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Open your mouth. I'm - because that...

BURKE: But you have to make the pew pew laser noises.

SALIE: Pew, pew, pew.

(LAUGHTER)

SALIE: This could be cool.

HONG: Faith, you are making me never want to have a baby ever.

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: I do like the new - I do love, like, the new answer you can give kids. Like, hey, mom, where do babies come from? They come from space.

(SOUNDBITE OF MECO'S "STAR WARS THEME/CANTINA BAND")

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists come up with excuses, but they're all lies. It's our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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