Good Luck Through Good Eating Black-eyed peas are one way to eat your way to good fortune in the New Year, according to popular custom. But this time of year, folks fall back on many food traditions, from grapes to noodles and greens.
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Good Luck Through Good Eating

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Good Luck Through Good Eating

Good Luck Through Good Eating

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ANDREA SEABROOK, Host:

New Year's Day isn't just bowl games and resolutions. Nearly every culture has special foods to eat on January 1st to ensure good luck and prosperity in the new year. WEEKEND EDITION commentator Bonny Wolf decided to try some for the New Year's Day brunch she's putting together for a newly married couple.

BONNY WOLF: The newlyweds are a happy, well-suited couple. They probably don't need all this extra insurance, but why take chances? Keep your fingers crossed.

SEABROOK: Bonny Wolf is author of "Talking With My Mouth Full" and contributing editor for Kitchen Window, NPR's online food column.

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