Voices in the News A montage of voices in this past week's news, including: Ben Bradlee of The Washington Post; humorist Art Buchwald; unidentified weather commentator; Dave Kranz of the California Farm Bureau; Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL); Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY); President Bush; Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-CT); Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).
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Voices in the News

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Voices in the News

Voices in the News

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JOHN YDSTIE, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm John Ydstie and these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

Mr. BEN BRADLEE (Vice President at Large, Washington Post): He loved the idea that he'd, you know, little Art Buchwald could poke fun at the president of the United States. That's kind of heady wine there for a while.

Mr. ART BUCHWALD (Columnist): While I was living it I don't think I said this is rotten. I did discover early in life I could make people laugh. And that's what changed my life, because as long as I could make them laugh, I could get a lot of love.

Unidentified Man: It covers a large portion of the country. We actually have below freezing temperatures extending all the way over to the East Coast through portions of New Jersey, New York, and as far west as the Rockies and parts of the Intermountain West.

Mr. DAVE KRANZ (California Farm Bureau Federation): I think it's fair to say that there will be fewer oranges and fewer lemons available. What we don't know is how much fewer. They'll be taking extra precautions to make sure that whatever fruit is sent to market is still of the highest quality.

Senator BARACK OBAMA (Democrat, Illinois): For the next several weeks, I'm going to talk with people from around the country, listening and learning more about the challenges we face as a nation, the opportunities that lie before us, and the role that a presidential campaign might play in bringing our country together.

Senator HILLARY CLINTON (Democrat, New York): I announce today that I'm forming a presidential exploratory committee. I'm not just starting a campaign though. I'm beginning a conversation, with you, with America. Because we all need to be part of the discussion if we're all going to be part of the solution.

Senator SAM BROWNBACK (Republican, Kansas): Today my family and I are taking the first steps on the yellow brick road to the White House.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: There's a lot of war weariness in this country, and I fully understand that. And we say okay, well, let's just leave. We can leave in stages, but let's just leave. Or let's just pull back and hope that the Iraqis are able to settle their business. The consequences of that decision will be disastrous.

Senator CHRISTOPHER DODD (Democrat, Connecticut): The president has laid down the gauntlet by just saying I'm going to go forward, I don't care what you say. And it seems to me we have an obligation up here to respond to that. Now, people look to us for leadership on these issues.

Senator JOHN MCCAIN (Republican, Arizona): If you oppose the policy, then cut off the funding. But that's the power of the purse; it's what the president - what the Congress has the power to do and they did it during Vietnam. And I think it's not intellectually honest to say you're going to Iraq to fight and risk your life and we don't support what you're doing, but we support you.

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