Letters: Oil Subsidies, Banjo Music Listeners respond to segments on oil subsidies and banjo music.
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Letters: Oil Subsidies, Banjo Music

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Letters: Oil Subsidies, Banjo Music

Letters: Oil Subsidies, Banjo Music

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REBECCA ROBERTS, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Roberts.

Time now for your letters. We received a number of e-mails about our letter segment last week, especially the one particular letter about oil subsidies. David Phillips(ph) of Seal Beach, California wrote: Russ Cunningham of Denver, defending tax breaks for oil companies, says that the U.S. has some of the highest corporate taxes in the industrialized world. Not true. It is true that the official U.S. tax rates are among the highest. But because of tax breaks and loopholes, the actual taxes paid are among the lowest. The taxes U.S. corporations pay add up to only two percent of our Gross Domestic Product, which puts us 26th out of 26 among members of the industrialized nations of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

And we received many letters about our banjo segment with Tony Trischka, Bela Fleck and Steve Martin last week. Cheryl Meeley(ph) of Portland, Oregon wrote: Having been raised in a Northwest-Southern musical household, banjo music has always held a special place in my heart. Great banjo pickers, I think, are sort of a dying breed. It's tremendously refreshing to hear music created by those who obviously love the genre, and who derive a great deal of pleasure from the gift they've been blessed to give. Thanks, guys.

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