Minimum-Wage Battle Shifts Back to House A Senate vote to end debate on a bill to raise the minimum wage does not mean President Bush will see legislation on his desk any time soon. A Republican move to add an amendment for $8.3 billion in business tax cuts will force more discussion in the House.
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Minimum-Wage Battle Shifts Back to House

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Minimum-Wage Battle Shifts Back to House

Minimum-Wage Battle Shifts Back to House

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Here's NPR's Brian Naylor.

BRIAN NAYLOR: Three weeks ago the House voted overwhelmingly to raise the minimum wage. It took about three hours of debate with no amendments. But the Senate likes amendments and it moves at its own pace - in a word: slow - too slow for Democratic Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts.

EDWARD KENNEDY: Every member of Congress has made $3,840 in the last week. $3,840 - what a minimum wage worker would make in four months.

NAYLOR: But South Carolina Republican Jim DeMint, among the 10 Republicans who voted against ending debate yesterday, said the minimum wage was unfair to states like his.

JIM DEMINT: Unfortunately, over the course of this discussion I've been forced to conclude that this whole debate is, let's just say, less than honest. What we're talking about here in the Senate is not really about helping low-income workers. This is about mandating a starting wage, not a minimum wage, on a select group of states.

NAYLOR: Brian Naylor, NPR News, the Capitol.

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