Pilots, FAA Chief Split Over Boeing 737 Max Training The top official at the FAA says airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software linked to two deadly crashes. His statement has divided pilots in the U.S. and overseas.
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Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pilots should know how to override the computer system suspected in two Boeing 737 Max crashes. That is what the acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration told Congress last week. As NPR's Daniella Cheslow reports, that statement is dividing pilots.

DANIELLA CHESLOW, BYLINE: Investigators are still piecing together what happened in the crashes of a Lion Air flight in October and an Ethiopian Airlines flight in March. But this much is known. In both cases, the planes crashed minutes after takeoff and after pilots appeared to struggle to control the planes. They did not seem to know how to handle a system that was forcing the nose of their planes down. Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz asked the acting chief of the FAA, Daniel Elwell, about it.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TED CRUZ: There's nothing in the pilot training about the MCAS system adjusting the nose of the plane downwards and how to compensate for that in the event of a malfunctioning sensor.

DANIEL ELWELL: Senator, I would actually say that it is accounted for in the training.

CHESLOW: Elwell went on to say that the real problem the 737 Max pilots faced was something called runaway pitch trim. Pitch refers to the angle of the plane's nose in the air. Every plane has systems for adjusting the pitch. And when a plane is cruising, it's usually controlled by autopilot. But if the system is out of control, pilots are trained to take over and fly the plane manually. Elwell emphasized that all pilots should know how to do that.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ELWELL: You're not fumbling through books. It's a time-critical procedure. And you go to that.

CHESLOW: The 737 Max is different, though. Boeing installed a software program called MCAS. It's meant to help pilots prevent a stall. For example, it would push the nose of the plane down if it senses the plane is flying at too steep of an angle. Pilots can override MCAS, but a lot of pilots say they didn't know the software existed until after the Lion Air crash. Captain Jason Goldberg flies for American Airlines and is a spokesman for its union. He disagrees that pilots got enough training to handle MCAS.

JASON GOLDBERG: I hate to be in a position to contradict Acting Director Elwell, but in this case, the statement is not correct.

CHESLOW: Goldberg says it's true that pilots train to overcome pitch trim so they can get the plane's nose flying at the right angle if the system goes haywire, but an MCAS malfunction on a Boeing 737 Max creates a host of other problems. And they're all distracting.

GOLDBERG: You would have the stick shaker, which is a rather violent, aggressive shaking of the control column. You would have the appearance of unreliable airspeed. You would have a number of warnings that don't immediately or intuitively give the impression of a pitch trim problem.

CHESLOW: MCAS seems to have baffled pilots in the two crashes. The Lion Air pilots reportedly flipped through a manual, looking for answers before their plane crashed, killing all onboard. A spokesperson for the Airline Pilots Association in Ethiopia wrote NPR to say there was nothing in their training to prepare pilots for the situation they faced. But even among pilots of major U.S. airlines, Elwell has triggered a stark difference of opinion.

JAMES BELTON: We have been trained on how to handle the mishap that occurred in at least the Lion Air jet that we know about.

CHESLOW: James Belton is a United Airlines pilot and a union spokesman. He says U.S. airlines have flown the 737 Max for hundreds of thousands of hours without a problem.

BELTON: I can't really comment as to the training that they get overseas. But I know here in America, we have not seen one data point saying that we had a performance or maintenance issue with it.

CHESLOW: Belton says that clean record is testament to rigorous U.S. standards. In most cases in the U.S., both the captain and the first officer, the co-pilot, need at least 1,500 hours of flight experience. Overseas, you can become a first officer with as little as 250 hours. On the Ethiopian Airlines flight that crashed, the captain had 8,100 hours of flight time, but the first officer had 350 hours.

Goldberg at American Airlines says it's not training alone that accounts for his safe experience flying the Max. He says his airline paid extra for additional safety equipment. Boeing now says those safety features will be standard on every 737 Max, and it will provide extra pilot training.

For now, the 737 Max planes remain grounded. The FAA says Boeing will be submitting its software and equipment fix for FAA approval in the coming weeks. Daniella Cheslow, NPR News, Washington.

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