April Showers Bring Yam Flowers In this anagram word game, contestants unscramble the names of flowers. Don't forget to stop and smell the A BIG ONES!
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April Showers Bring Yam Flowers

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April Showers Bring Yam Flowers

April Showers Bring Yam Flowers

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

From NPR and WNYC, coming to you from The Bell House in beautiful Brooklyn, N.Y., it's NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and trivia, ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm Jonathan Coulton. Now here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Hey, everybody. Look at this. How many people are here for the first time at a taping?

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yup. Good. Good. I like that you clapped. A couple of people went for the raised hand. That's how I know you are public radio listeners.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Like, there is an answer I will answer like I did in my academic classes. So there's going to be some jokes about Easter and Passover.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I feel like, with both of these holidays coming up so close together, I feel like between not eating bread for Passover and decorating eggs for Easter, we're all going to be accidentally doing the whole 30.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Unless you're celebrating 4/20, in which case, you're eating everything...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Everything. And Easter and Passover both have little scavenger hunts for kids but very different tones...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Right? The Easter one is like, hey, kids. Go find some decorated eggs. They're, like, blue and pink and colorful. And then when you find them, you can eat them. They're chocolate. And for the Jews, it's like, hey, kid. Go find a dry cracker.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It's a symbol of slavery.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And when you find it, you can eat it. It should taste of our suffering. You can close the door. The ghost's already here.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Do you do Easter baskets and stuff?

JONATHAN COULTON: We - yeah. We do Easter baskets. Yeah.

EISENBERG: Aw. I love that.

COULTON: When I was a kid, I used to (laughter) - I used to try to catch the Easter Bunny. I used to - every year, I used to build a trap.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: No.

COULTON: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Like, out of what?

COULTON: Well, I'll tell you one trap that I remember was (laughter) a carrot on a string. And the string was threaded through, like, the light fixture in the front hallway of our house.

EISENBERG: Oh, my goodness.

COULTON: And it was just over, like, a brown, paper shopping bag.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Do you want me to tell you how it worked?

EISENBERG: (Laughter) Yes.

COULTON: Well, the Easter Bunny would come and see the carrot...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: ...Want to eat it...

EISENBERG: Sure.

COULTON: ...Jump up and grab the carrot. The extra weight of the bunny would make him fall down into the brown paper bag, which he would be unable to escape.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: But, apparently, I got very close to catching him because he left me a note.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: And he said, you almost caught me, which...

EISENBERG: Oh.

COULTON: ...Inspired me to try again every year for a long time.

EISENBERG: That is the best. That is the best.

COULTON: Never got him.

EISENBERG: By the way, everyone, we are celebrating women in comedy...

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: ...This month on ASK ME ANOTHER. That's right. Our special guest on the show - I'm so excited - we have Retta.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You know her as Donna on "Parks And Recreation," the show that asked the groundbreaking question, what if our government was dysfunctional in, like, a fun, cute way?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And on that show, her character originates the great catchphrase, treat yourself.

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: Also, Retta stars on NBC's "Good Girls."

(CHEERING)

EISENBERG: Yes. My favorite premise of all time, of course, is three women have to turn to the life of crime to save their families. And I got to say I was thinking if I had to rob a grocery store, which one would I rob? - Trader Joe's. I think Trader Joe's would be the best bet because I think they would still be super nice to you...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Even while you were robbing them.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So everybody, we have four brilliant contestants. They are backstage right now, munching on matza. And soon, they're going to be out here playing some nerdy games. And one of them will become our big winner. So let's play some games, everybody.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

EISENBERG: Our first game is about flowers. Did you know the average couple spends $1,400 on decorative wedding flowers? Yeah. I will sit in the center of your table for 300 bucks.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Let's meet our contestants. First up, Katie Wogksch (ph) - you're an accountant.

KATIE WOGKSCH: Yes.

EISENBERG: OK. So your mom's an accountant. So you followed in her footsteps.

WOGKSCH: Yeah.

EISENBERG: Is your mom proud that you are also an accountant?

WOGKSCH: I guess so. I think she wanted me to be, like, a lion tamer or something.

EISENBERG: A lion tamer?

WOGKSCH: When I was a kid, I was just like, I'm going to be anything except an accountant because you want to do the opposite of what your parents do.

EISENBERG: Sure.

WOGKSCH: When I got older, I'm like, well, she has a good - like, the hours are good. The pay is good, you know? I might as well.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

WOGKSCH: Why not?

EISENBERG: Yeah. You're pragmatic. You're practical.

WOGKSCH: Yeah. There we go.

EISENBERG: And do you like it? Is it fun?

WOGKSCH: Yeah. It is fun. I like numbers. Numbers are fun.

EISENBERG: Numbers are fun. All right. Katie, when you ring in, we're going to hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Erika Meyer (ph). You manage a global health research project. You say most people aren't really sure what that means when you tell them.

ERIKA MEYER: Yes.

EISENBERG: So I ask you, what does it mean?

MEYER: Well, I like to explain public health as the systems that, when they're working well, you don't necessarily know about them.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

MEYER: You're not sick. So...

EISENBERG: Right - so you wouldn't even know about your job...

MEYER: The water's clean. The food that you're eating has been inspected. Restaurants are clean.

EISENBERG: They all got A's.

MEYER: Yes.

EISENBERG: OK - fantastic.

MEYER: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: Erika, when you ring in, we'll hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Katie and Erika, whoever has more points after two games will go on to our final round. This word game is called April Showers Bring Yam Flowers. In this game, you'll pretend to be florists. Jonathan and I are your customers. But at your shop, you don't just arrange flowers. You also rearrange the letters in words.

COULTON: Each of our requests ends with a word or phrase that's an anagram of a flower. For example, if I said, I need a purple flower for my purple party - my guests will love it - you would answer violet, which is an anagram of love it. Ready? Ring in to answer.

WOGKSCH: Awesome.

COULTON: Here we go.

EISENBERG: I won a red flower for my crush. But I can't kiss her because I have a cold sore.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Katie.

WOGKSCH: Rose?

EISENBERG: Rose is correct, yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's always good to start off a show with a herpes simplex one...

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Makes everyone feel comfortable.

EISENBERG: Exactly.

COULTON: I need a tall, yellow flower for my friend, who's taking a break from her day job at a hospital to perform at a rap show. She's got nurse flow.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Katie.

WOGKSCH: Sunflower.

COULTON: Yeah, that's correct.

WOGKSCH: I got it (laughter).

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Go Ohio State. For my game-day party, I want something that looks like sunflowers but smaller. I'll be wearing my OSU T-shirt and Buckeye sandals.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Erika.

MEYER: Black-eyed Susan?

EISENBERG: Yes. Nice.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Do you sell weeds? I am throwing a party for my father to launch his new lawn care website, OnlineDad.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Erika.

MEYER: Dandelion.

COULTON: Yeah, you got it.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I love the lawn care website OnlineDad. That is just...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Porn of dad bods with lawnmowers...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: ...Trimming hedges, mowing lawns.

COULTON: If onlinedad.com is not already taken, I'm going to register it tonight.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This is your last clue. Does he love me? Does he love me not? I need to pull petals off of this flower to find out. I wish my crush would stop worrying about his super ego. What does his id say?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Erika.

MEYER: Daisy.

EISENBERG: You are correct. Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Great game. Erika is in the lead.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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