Away Games Hut! Hut! Hike! In this game, contestants identify professional sports teams that moved cities, but kept their original geographically-specific names.
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Away Games

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Away Games

Away Games

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Our next game is about sports teams. Remember, there is no I in team, but there is an I in I don't know anything about sports teams. Let's meet our contestants. First up, Anna Danzinger Halperin. You're a historian and adjunct professor.

ANNA DANZIGER HALPERIN: That's right.

EISENBERG: Fantastic. So do people always expect you to know everything about all of history?

HALPERIN: Everything.

EISENBERG: Everything about all of history?

HALPERIN: Everything. They'll just come up to me and say, oh, so do you know a lot about this one person in this one time in an obscure situation? No.

EISENBERG: And you just say no?

HALPERIN: No. Or I'll say, oh, yeah. That sounds interesting.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Fantastic. Anna, when you ring in, we'll hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Your opponent is Corey Wisk (ph). You manage a stadium in New Jersey. You've been working there nine years, and you say you see something different every day.

COREY WISK: That's right.

EISENBERG: OK, so what's something exciting that you saw recently?

WISK: Well, we had a major event...

EISENBERG: Yeah.

WISK: ...WrestleMania...

EISENBERG: Oh, yeah.

WISK: ...Which was pretty interesting.

EISENBERG: Sure.

WISK: So I got to see a bunch of former professional wrestlers backstage, so that was new.

EISENBERG: Yeah. Did you shake hands with them?

WISK: No, just kind of observed and...

EISENBERG: Just watched them.

WISK: ...Nerded out in the corner.

EISENBERG: Nerded out in the corner. Awesome. Corey, when you ring in, we'll hear this.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Remember, Anna and Corey, whoever has more points after two games will go to the final round. Let's go to your first game, called Away Games. Many professional sports teams have names reflecting the history and culture of their city, like the Pittsburgh Steelers. Sometimes, professional sports teams move to a new city but keep their old name, even if it no longer makes any sense. So we're going to ask you questions about teams that have moved. You tell us the team name and where it plays now. Ring in to answer. Here we go. This basketball team was named in honor of Minnesota's thousands of bodies of water. In 1960, the team moved to a drought-prone city in southern California.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Anna.

HALPERIN: The Los Angeles Lakers.

EISENBERG: You got it. Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

JONATHAN COULTON: New Orleans' rich musical heritage inspired this basketball team's name. But in 1979, the team traded Louis Armstrong for the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, thus moving from the nation's biggest party to the nation's nonexistent party.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Corey.

WISK: Utah Jazz.

COULTON: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: In 2001, these mean brown bears migrated from the mountains of Vancouver to Tennessee, where only black bears live. Watching them on the basketball court, you'd think they're still in hibernation.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right. Anna.

HALPERIN: The Memphis Grizzlies?

EISENBERG: Yeah. That's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That's right. We just did an NPR sports burn.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Yeah, it's very uncharacteristic.

EISENBERG: It's very treatable.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: In the late 1800s, this public transit-themed Brooklyn baseball team got its name from how good its fans were at jumping out of the way of electric trolley cars. The team moved west, and now most of its fans are stuck in traffic on the 110.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Corey.

WISK: The LA Dodgers.

COULTON: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Yes, I also learned that - that obviously, when electric train cars were introduced and everyone was used to trolley cars being drawn by horses, they, all of a sudden, had to jump out of the way. They weren't used to that.

COULTON: Right, because the horses...

EISENBERG: They dodged them.

COULTON: ...Would stop when they saw a person in the street.

EISENBERG: Right.

COULTON: Not the robot trains.

EISENBERG: No, not the robot trains.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Now it'd be called the Brooklyn Subway Is Delayed Due To Train Traffic Aheads.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This Baltimore football team was named in recognition of the Preakness Stakes thoroughbred race. Then it moved to the home of the Indy 500, trading horses for horsepower.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Corey.

WISK: The Indianapolis Colts.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: Sometimes, a team moves to a city where its name makes more sense. Take this basketball team founded in Fort Wayne, Ind., where its owner ran a foundry that produced engine parts. They were firing on all cylinders when they drove up to the Motor City.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Corey.

WISK: The Detroit Pistons.

COULTON: That's right.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is your last clue. This basketball team was named for the ballistic missiles developed on the super-chill beaches of San Diego, but then it moved to Texas, where mission control calls the game.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Anna.

HALPERIN: The Houston Rockets?

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That was a very close game. Corey is in the lead.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: If you lettered in high school not for athletics but for the competitive crossword team, you should be on our show. Go to amatickets.org. Coming up, we have more of actress and comedian Retta. Retta began her career as a chemist, so she was always well-versed in blowing up. I'm Ophira Eisenberg, and this is ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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