Sunday Puzzle: City Sounds NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Weekend Edition Puzzlemaster Will Shortz play a word game with KANW and KUNM listener Kirstie Newman of Santa Fe, N.M.
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Sunday Puzzle: City Sounds

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Sunday Puzzle: City Sounds

Sunday Puzzle: City Sounds

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So I hear you're taking a trip to Hawaii.

SHORTZ: Yes, I am. It's a crazy trip. I'm flying on Wednesday, speaking on Thursday morning and flying back on Friday.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. What part of Hawaii?

SHORTZ: Kauai.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, I've never been. I hear it's lovely.

SHORTZ: It'll be my first time.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Well, it doesn't sound like you're going to have a lot of time to spend there. But enjoy your trip.

SHORTZ: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said, think of a word for a deceitful person. Move the middle letter to the end, and you'll get another word for a deceitful person. What words are these? And the answer is sneak to snake. And I'll tell you it's not, as one of our listeners wrote in, Santa to Satan. Santa is not deceitful.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received 835 responses. And our winner this week is Kirstie Newman of Santa Fe, N.M.

Kirstie, congratulations.

KIRSTIE NEWMAN: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So I hear this is the first time you've ever submitted something to The Puzzle.

NEWMAN: It actually is. It's the first time I ever solved it, and I submitted it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) And you won. And I also hear that you began a new hobby.

NEWMAN: Oh, yes. I started doing cabaret singing a couple of months ago, and I'm having a blast (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, that's nice. Want to give us a little bit of a preview?

NEWMAN: No, I don't.

(LAUGHTER)

NEWMAN: No, I don't.

SHORTZ: Funny.

NEWMAN: It'll give you an excuse to come visit Santa Fe, which people don't usually need an excuse to come (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Fair enough. Are you ready to play The Puzzle?

NEWMAN: Oh, I'm as ready as I'm going to be.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Kirstie, I'm going to read you some sentences. Each one conceals the name of a U.S. city both phonetically and by spelling. Name the cities. For example, if I said the musician composed a crackerjack sonata in Mississippi, you would say Jackson because that's hidden phonetically and in spelling inside crackerjack sonata.

NEWMAN: OK.

SHORTZ: And each sentence will include the city's state. Here's number one. The governor did a handspring fielding questions in Illinois.

NEWMAN: Someplace Illinois.

SHORTZ: Yeah. The governor did a handspring...

NEWMAN: Springfield, Ill. There we go.

SHORTZ: Springfield is it. Good. Number two - my grandmother would belittle rocking chairs from Arkansas.

NEWMAN: Little Rock, Ark.

SHORTZ: That's it. I'm looking for a semi-pro vocational training in Utah.

NEWMAN: Provo, Utah.

SHORTZ: Nice. Everyone hated to see Wilbur bankrupted in California.

NEWMAN: Wilbur, California, bankrupt.

SHORTZ: Here it is again. Everyone hated to see Wilbur bankrupted in California.

NEWMAN: I'm going to need a little hint (laughter).

SHORTZ: OK. Well, the most - always look for the most awkward part of the sentence. And here it's definitely Wilbur bankrupted.

NEWMAN: This one - can't think (laughter).

SHORTZ: All right. I'll tell you. It's...

NEWMAN: Ain't coming to me.

SHORTZ: ...Burbank, Burbank. Wilbur...

NEWMAN: Oh, Burbank, of course.

SHORTZ: ...Bankrupted. Yeah, yeah.

NEWMAN: All right.

SHORTZ: All right.

NEWMAN: Well - little too twisted (laughter).

SHORTZ: Here's your next one. Let's plan singalongs all around Michigan.

NEWMAN: Oh. Singalong...

SHORTZ: What's the capital of Michigan?

NEWMAN: Lansing, Mich.

SHORTZ: There you go - plan singalongs. Good. That's some weirdo vernacular in Delaware.

NEWMAN: Doe (ph) vernacular in Delaware.

SHORTZ: What's the capital?

NEWMAN: I apologize, Delaware.

SHORTZ: (Laughter).

NEWMAN: I don't know what your capital is. I probably do. I'm just not...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It's also an English city where there are cliffs.

SHORTZ: That's true.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: The White Cliffs of...

NEWMAN: Wilshire, wilsh (ph) - will (ph).

SHORTZ: No. Look inside weirdo vernacular. That's some weirdo vernacular.

NEWMAN: Dover, Del.

SHORTZ: Dover is it. Good.

NEWMAN: Dover, Del. There it is.

SHORTZ: The diners ordered some jumbo calamari in Florida.

NEWMAN: Jumbo - jumbo calamari.

SHORTZ: Yeah, look inside jumbo calamari. Start with the O of jumbo.

NEWMAN: Oh.

SHORTZ: Yeah, just say that.

NEWMAN: Ocalla (ph).

SHORTZ: Ocala - Ocala, which is near Disney World. Here's your last one. You mistakenly called Cornwall a wall about a year ago in Washington.

NEWMAN: Walla Walla, Wash.

SHORTZ: There you go. You got it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah, bringing it in strong. How do you feel?

NEWMAN: Oh, I feel silly (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: No, come on. You did great.

SHORTZ: You did fine, yeah.

NEWMAN: This was fun. This was very fun.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. What member station do you listen to?

NEWMAN: Well, I listen to two of them, and they're out of Albuquerque - KUNM and KANW.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Kirstie Newman of Santa Fe, N.M., thank you for playing The Puzzle.

NEWMAN: You're welcome. Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, what's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Daniel Nathan (ph) of Washington, D.C. Think of a common greeting in another country. You can rearrange its letters to get the capital of a country that neighbors the country where this greeting is commonly spoken. What greeting is it? So, again, common greeting in another country. Rearrange its letters to get the capital of a country that neighbors the country where this greeting is commonly spoken. What greeting is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website npr.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Remember; just one entry per person please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, April 25, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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