Mother's Day StoryCorps: A Daughter Learns More From Her Mom's Best Friend Sada Jackson remembers her mother by talking to her mom's best friend, Angela Morehead-Mugita. Angela passes along advice to Sada that Sada's mom had once given to her.
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'I Only Knew Her As Mom': A Daughter Learns More From Her Late Mother's Best Friend

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'I Only Knew Her As Mom': A Daughter Learns More From Her Late Mother's Best Friend

'I Only Knew Her As Mom': A Daughter Learns More From Her Late Mother's Best Friend

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's Friday morning, which is when we hear from StoryCorps. And on this Friday before Mother's Day, we hear from Sada Jackson, who lost her mother, Ileana, in 2016. Jackson came to StoryCorps in Kansas City, Mo., with her mom's best friend, Angela Morehead-Mugita.

SADA JACKSON: I just thought it'd be really cool to sit with one of her friends. Like, how often do you get to do that, to sit with your parents' friends and just ask questions and they don't get to jump in and say, don't tell her that?

ANGELA MOREHEAD-MUGITA: Right. Don't tell her what I said.

JACKSON: I said I want to know more about my mom as a woman because I only knew her as mom.

MOREHEAD-MUGITA: The part that most children don't see from their parents is the vulnerability. I think for the both of us, we became vaults for each other. We called them vaults. She's like, OK, I need a vault moment. As a matter of fact, she helped me when I had my son. I remember calling her the day I came home with Christopher. I sat on my couch. And I had all of these beautiful things from my baby shower. And I'm just bawling.

I said, Ileana, what am I supposed to do now? And she was so clear. She's like, you're going to hold your baby. All that stuff in the living room is going to stay right here until you get yourself together. So that was the one thing about Ileana. She would never let me lose it.

JACKSON: I got emotional when you were telling this story because losing my mom to breast cancer when I was entering my eighth month of pregnancy and not having a chance to call her when I got home, it still bothers me. But at the same time, I heard her say, don't you be no sad momma for my grandbaby.

(LAUGHTER)

MOREHEAD-MUGITA: Oh, yeah. She's like, I need my daughter to be strong.

JACKSON: Yeah. And I'm feeling that. I'm feeling, like, her encouraging me, saying, now you're the mother. You're a woman.

MOREHEAD-MUGITA: Oh, yeah.

JACKSON: And when my baby looks up to me and I'm singing certain lullabies that she sang to me, I'll do like a little run. And I'll be like, that was a mom run.

MOREHEAD-MUGITA: That's your mother.

(LAUGHTER)

MOREHEAD-MUGITA: Yep. I'm watching every seed that your mother sowed in life manifest in you, in your son, in your marriage. And I remember when my mother had passed away, she came to the funeral. She hugged me. She whispered in my ear. And she said, you got this. You will not break down. You will walk in there and be the legacy that your mother left you. And so I say that to you. You will not lose it. You will not break down. And you will walk in the legacy that your mother left for you.

INSKEEP: Angela Morehead-Mugita and Sada Jackson for StoryCorps. Their interview will be archived with the others at the Library of Congress.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIENNA TENG'S "CITY HALL")

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