Public Picks Favorite American Buildings The American Institute of Architects has compiled a list of the most appealing buildings in the U.S. The Empire State Building ranked number one, but Washington, D.C., claimed the most structures in the top 10.
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Public Picks Favorite American Buildings

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Public Picks Favorite American Buildings

Public Picks Favorite American Buildings

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Our last word is from the American Institute of Architects, which ranks the 150 most appealing buildings in the U.S.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Number one on this year's list is the Empire State Building. Number two is the White House. Washington D.C., in total, has five buildings in the top 10, including the National Cathedral and the U.S. Capitol.

MONTAGNE: In the category of best architecture, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis was number 14. Now, so far none of these are surprises, but there were some, says Rick Bell, who's with the American Institute of Architects.

RICK BELL: Top of the list would be the New York Times building in New York City. Now, you'll be surprised that a building that's not yet finished should be one of America's favorites.

INSKEEP: Some other favorites include the Biltmore Mansion in Asheville, North Carolina, which is number eight.

MONTAGNE: The Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone National Park came in at number 36.

INSKEEP: Last on the list of 150 top buildings - can you imagine these buildings having to thank each other at the ceremony like the Oscars? Last on the list of 150 top buildings was Battle Hall at the University of Texas at Austin.

MONTAGNE: The list is mostly fun to read. Except for one landmark that made the survey, one that no longer exists.

BELL: The World Trade Center at number 19, it might not have been on the list but for the fact that people think about it a lot.

MONTAGNE: The American Institute of Architects surveyed nearly 2,000 people at the end of last year. You can see the full list at npr.org.

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